32nd century BC

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Jfb skara brae

Excavated dwellings at Skara Brae, Europe's most complete Neolithic village.

Significant personsEdit

Inventions, discoveries, introductionsEdit

  • 3114 BC — According to the most widely-accepted correlations between the Western calendar and the calendar systems of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, the mythical starting point of the current Mesoamerican Long Count calendar cycle occurs in this year.[1] The Long Count calendar, used and refined most notably by the Maya civilization but also attested in some other (earlier) Mesoamerican cultures, consisted of a series of interlocked cycles or periods of day-counts, which mapped out a linear sequence of days from a notional starting point. The system originated sometime in the Mid– to Late Preclassic period of Mesoamerican chronology, during the latter half of the 1st millennium BC.[2] The starting point of the most commonly used highest-order cycle[3] Although it is still contended which of these three dates forms the actual starting base of the Long Count, the correlation to one of this triad of dates is definitively accepted by almost all contemporary Mayanists. All other earlier or later correlation proposals are now discounted.[4]
  • 3102 BCYear 0 of the Kali Yuga begins.
  • c. 3100 BC the earliest phase of Stonehenge construction begins.

Decades and yearsEdit


  1. ^ See Finley (2002), Houston (1989, pp.49–51), Miller and Taube (1993, pp.50–52), Schele and Freidel (1990, pp.430 et seq.), Voss (2006, p.138), Wagner (2006, pp.281–283). Note that Houston 1989 mistakenly writes "3113 BC" (when "-3113" is meant), and Miller and Taube 1993's mention of "2 August" is a (presumed) erratum.
  2. ^ Miller and Taube (1993, p.50), Schele and Freidel (1990)
  3. ^ Most commonly used in the Classic period Maya inscriptions; some other Maya calendar; sources which have used this 584285 correlation include Houston (1989, p.51), and in particular Schele and Freidel (1990, pp.430 et seq.). See also commentary by Finley (2002), who although making an assessment that the "[584285 correlation] is now more popular with Mayanists", expresses a personal preference for the 584283 correlation.
  4. ^ See survey by Finley (2002).


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