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Aleksandr Vsevolodovich of Belz, Prince of Belz
Princes of Volhynia, was born 1180 to Vsevolod Mstislavich of Volhynia (c1160-1196) and died 1235 in Halych, Halych Rayon, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, Ukraine of unspecified causes. Notable ancestors include Alfred the Great (849-899), Charlemagne (747-814). Ancestors are from Belarus, Russia, Ukraine, Sweden, the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, the Byzantine Empire.

Alexander Vsevolodovich (died after 1234 ) - Prince Belzsky (1195-1207, 1214-1232, 1233-1234), Vladimir-Volynsky (1208-1209, 1210-1214).

Contents 1 Biography 2 Family and children 3 See also 4 References 5 References Biography In 1208, with the support of the Polish princes Leshko and Konrad, he replaced the representative of the northern Olhovychy Svyatoslav Igorevich on the Volyn throne , taking advantage of the disagreement in the camp of the Igorevich brothers. The inhabitants of Vladimir themselves opened the gates to the Poles, saying: "You are our friends; with you nephew of the Great Roman . " The Poles, however, looted houses and churches, Svyatoslav Igorevich was captured. Vladimirs strongly complained about the Poles, said that "if they were not with Alexander, then we would not let them go and the Bug ."

Alexander voknyazhilsya in Vladimir, Leszko married his daughter, Gremislava.

Later Poles wanted to plant in Vladimir the eldest of the Volyn princes, his uncle Ingvar Yaroslavich , and Alexander gave him the throne. But the boyars did not like Ingvar and, with the consent of Leszek, in 1210 Alexander became established in Vladimir-Volynsky. At the behest of Leszek Belz, he gave his cousin Vasilko Romanovich (Leshka was persuaded by Vasilka's mother ).

Participated in the Hungarian-Polish-Russian alliance against Vladimir Igorevich and his brothers in 1211 . Vladimir Igorevich was expelled, and his brothers were hanged. Leszko ordered Alexandr to give to the young Daniil and Vasilko Romanovich Tikhoml and Przemysl . The Poles gave Daniel and Galich , but soon he was expelled by the boyars. Leszek took away Belz for Belz for Alexander.

In 1213, Alexander and his brother Vsevolod Belzsky took part in the campaign of Leszek Bely against the boyar Vladislav Kormilich , who occupied the Galician throne. He opposed them to the river Bobrok with an army of Hungarians and Czechs. The allies managed to defeat Vladislav, but they could not take Galich.

In 1214, Leszek White asked Alexander to retire from Vladimir and give the reign to Daniil Romanovich as compensation for Galich, in which the Hungarian king's son was imprisoned according to the Lesch Agreement of Leszek and Andrász II . Alexander refused to voluntarily give up the city and was expelled by Lyoshko.

In 1215 , when relations between the young Romanovs and their neighbors worsened again, Alexander opposed them. Daniel and Vasilko, however, were able to fight back and ruined the Belzu parish. Only the intervention of Daniel's father-in-law Mstislav Mstislavitch Udatnogo could stop the Romanovics.

Then Alexander quarreled with Daniel and his father-in-law Mstislav, who reigned in Galich, whom he inclined towards war with the Romanovs. However, in the outbreak of internal strife, Mstislav acted sluggishly, and the Belzas parish was again terribly devastated. Soon, Udatny realized that he was being deceived, and reconciled with Daniel. He also asked the young prince to stop the ruin of the Belz land.

After that, Alexander Vsevolodovich with the support of Chernigov prince Mikhail Vsevolodovich , Vladimir Rurikovich of Kiev and Polovtsians Kotyan tried to regain the Volynian reign, but Daniel was able to defend his possessions thanks to Polish aid. After the death of Mstislav Udatnogo in 1228 , Daniel revived in Galicia.

In 1230 Alexander was accused of preparing an attempt on Daniel and Vasilka: the boyars wanted to burn them in a palace or kill them at a feast. N. Karamzin writes that the plot was discovered by chance: "Young Vasilko, once playing with the court, jokingly drew his sword: the conspirators were horrified, thinking that their intention had opened, fled from the palace and the city." Alexander Vsevolodovich for this was deprived Belza and with his associates fled to Peremyshl, not having had time to seize the treasury. The following year, he was expelled by Daniel and from there, after which he took refuge in Hungary. He began to raise against Daniel King Andras II. Hungarians captured Galich, Vladimir (who surrendered them without a fight) and many cities, Belz and Cherventhey gave Alexander and continued to press the Romanovichs. Alexander together with the Hungarians fought against Daniel at Shumsk .

At the beginning of 1232, however, he quarreled with the Hungarians and gave Daniel a message: "I do not fit to be anywhere but you." The brothers forgave him.

In 1233 they besieged Galich, where Hungarians sat with seditious boyars. Their governor, boyar Sudislav , sent to tell Alexander: "I'll give you Galich, just back off from my brother." Alexander was deceived by the promise and stepped back. However, Daniel still managed to occupy the city. The following year, Alexander Vsevolodovich fled to Kiev , but on the way was captured by the soldiers of Daniel in captivity. According to the hypothesis of L.Voytovich, he died in confinement.

Family and children Father : Vsevolod Mstislavich - Prince Belzsky (1170-1195), Vladimir-Volynsky (1188).

Wife : Vladimir Rurikovich's daughter .

Children:

Novel Gremislava, issued for Leszek Bely (according to the chronicle of the daughter of Ingvar Yaroslavich) Anastasia , married first to the Mazovian prince Boleslav , and then to Hungarian boyar Dimitar

See also

[[The war for the unification of the Principality of Halych-Volhynia]]

Notes


Siblings


Offspring of Vsevolod Mstislavich of Volhynia and unknown parent
Name Birth Death Joined with
Aleksandr Vsevolodovich of Belz (c1180-c1235) 1180 1235 Halych, Halych Rayon, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, Ukraine
Vsevolod Vsevolodovich of Cherven (c1182-c1240)

Residences

Footnotes (including sources)

Contributors

  Afil