Buncombe County, North Carolina

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Buncombe County, North Carolina
Buncombe County nc seal
Map of North Carolina highlighting Buncombe County
Location in the state of North Carolina
Map of USA NC
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1791
Seat Asheville
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

660 sq mi (1,709 km²)
656 sq mi (1,699 km²)
4 sq mi (10 km²), 0.58%
 - (2005)
 - Density

313/sq mi (121/km²)

Buncombe County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is part of the Asheville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population estimate for 2005 was 218,876.[1] Its county seat is AshevilleGR6.

History Edit

The county was formed in 1791 from parts of Burke County and Rutherford County. It was named for Edward Buncombe, a colonel in the American Revolutionary War, who was captured at the Battle of Germantown.

In 1808 the western part of Buncombe County became Haywood County. In 1833 parts of Burke County and Buncombe County were combined to form Yancey County, and in 1838 the southern part of what was left of Buncombe County became Henderson County. In 1851 parts of Buncombe County and Yancey County were combined to form Madison County. Finally, in 1925 the Broad River township of McDowell County was transferred to Buncombe County.

In 1820, a U.S. Congressman, whose district included Buncombe County, unintentionally contributed a word to the English language. In the Sixteenth Congress, after lengthy debate on the Missouri Compromise, members of the House called for an immediate vote on that important question. Instead, Felix Walker rose to address his colleagues, insisting that his constituents expected him to make a speech "for Buncombe." It was later remarked that Walker's untimely and irrelevant oration was not just for Buncombe--it "was Buncombe." Thus, buncombe, afterwards spelled bunkum and then shortened to bunk, became a term for empty, nonsensical talk.

Law and government Edit

Buncombe County is a member of the Land-of-Sky Regional Council of governments.

Buncombe County has a council/manager form of government.

The 2004 election voted in the current commissioners: David Young, David Gantt, Bill Stanley, Carol Peterson, and chair Nathan Ramsey. The county manager is Wanda Greene.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,709 km² (660 sq mi). 1,699 km² (656 sq mi) of it is land and 10 km² (4 sq mi) of it (0.58%) is water.

The French Broad River enters the county at its border with Henderson County to the south and flows north into Madison County. The source of the Swannanoa River, which joins the French Broad River in Asheville, is in northeast Buncombe County at Mount Mitchell. A milestone was achieved in 2003 when Interstate 26 was extended from Mars Hill (north of Asheville) to Johnson City completing a 20-year half-billion dollar construction project through the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Major HighwaysEdit

Townships Edit

The county is divided into fifteen townships: Asheville, Avery Creek, Black Mountain, Broad River, Fairview, Flat Creek, French Broad, Ivy, Leicester, Limestone, Lower Hominy, Reems Creek, Sandy Mush, Swannanoa, and Upper Hominy.

Adjacent Counties Edit


As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 206,330 people, 85,776 households, and 55,668 families residing in the county. The population density was 121/km² (314/sq mi). There were 93,973 housing units at an average density of 55/km² (143/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 89.06% White, 7.48% Black or African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.66% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.15% from other races, and 1.23% from two or more races. 2.78% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 85,776 households out of which 27.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.50% were married couples living together, 10.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.10% were non-families. 28.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the county the population was spread out with 21.90% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 29.30% from 25 to 44, 24.80% from 45 to 64, and 15.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,666, and the median income for a family was $45,011. Males had a median income of $30,705 versus $23,870 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,384. About 7.80% of families and 11.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.30% of those under age 18 and 9.80% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns Edit

Map of Buncombe County North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

Map of Buncombe County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

Census-designated places Edit

References Edit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 35°37′N 82°32′W / 35.61, -82.53

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Buncombe County, North Carolina. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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