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Butler County, Kentucky
Butler County Courthouse Kentucky
Butler County Courthouse in Morgantown
Map of Kentucky highlighting Butler County
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of USA KY
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Founded 1810
Named for Richard Butler
Seat Morgantown
Largest city Morgantown
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

431 sq mi (1,116 km²)
426 sq mi (1,103 km²)
5.4 sq mi (14 km²), 1.2%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

13,010
30/sq mi (12/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website http://www.butlercounty.ky.gov/

Butler County is a county located in the US state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,690.[1] Its county seat is Morgantown.[2] The county was formed in 1810, becoming Kentucky's 53rd county.[3] It is a prohibition, or "dry", county.

Butler County is included in the Bowling Green, KY Metropolitan Statistical Area.

HistoryEdit

Numerous archaeological sites are located along the Green River in Butler County. A 1932 survey found nine sites, many of which were a group of shell mounds, including the Carlston Annis and DeWeese Shell Mounds.[4]

The area now known as Butler County was first settled by the families of Richard C. Dellium and James Forgy, who founded a town called Berry's Lick. The first industry was salt-making.[3]

On January 18, 1810, the Kentucky General Assembly created Butler County from portions of Logan and Ohio counties. The new county was named for Major General Richard Butler, who died at the Battle of the Wabash in 1791.[3]

Butler County has one of only two Civil War monuments in Kentucky that honor the soldiers of both sides. The Confederate-Union Veterans' Monument in Morgantown, a zinc monument, was dedicated in 1907 on the Butler County Courthouse lawn.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 431 square miles (1,120 km2), of which 426 square miles (1,100 km2) is land and 5.4 square miles (14 km2) (1.2%) is water.[5] It is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky.

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 3,083
1830 3,058 −0.8%
1840 3,898 27.5%
1850 5,755 47.6%
1860 7,927 37.7%
1870 9,404 18.6%
1880 12,181 29.5%
1890 13,956 14.6%
1900 15,896 13.9%
1910 15,805 −0.6%
1920 15,197 −3.8%
1930 12,620 −17.0%
1940 14,371 13.9%
1950 11,309 −21.3%
1960 9,586 −15.2%
1970 9,723 1.4%
1980 11,064 13.8%
1990 11,245 1.6%
2000 13,010 15.7%
2010 12,690 −2.5%
Est. 2016 12,845 [6] −1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 13,010 people, 5,059 households, and 3,708 families residing in the county. The population density was 30 per square mile (12 /km2). There were 5,815 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.88% White, 0.52% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.60% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. 1.04% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,059 households out of which 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.30% were married couples living together, 9.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.70% were non-families. 23.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.30% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 29.20% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, and 12.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,405, and the median income for a family was $35,317. Males had a median income of $26,449 versus $19,894 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,617. About 13.10% of families and 16.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.50% of those under age 18 and 22.50% of those age 65 or over.

CommunitiesEdit

PoliticsEdit

Like the central Pennyroyal Plateau, but unlike the Jackson Purchase or Barren and Simpson Counties, Butler County was strongly pro-Union during the Civil War due to its broken, sandy terrain unfavourable for plantation agriculture,[12] although its actual level of Union volunteering was lower than more easterly Pennyroyal counties.[13] Consequently, Butler County has remained rock-ribbed Republican thought the post-Civil War era: the last Democrat to carry the county was George B. McClellan in 1864, and the only Democrat to win forty percent of the county’s vote since at least 1896 has been Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932.

Presidential Elections Results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 79.4% 4,428 17.0% 947 3.6% 201
2012 73.4% 3,716 25.6% 1,293 1.0% 51
2008 69.6% 3,696 29.3% 1,555 1.1% 56
2004 73.7% 4,109 25.7% 1,436 0.6% 33
2000 72.9% 3,654 25.9% 1,299 1.1% 57
1996 61.0% 2,531 30.4% 1,260 8.6% 358
1992 56.8% 2,729 30.6% 1,468 12.7% 609
1988 72.2% 3,278 27.4% 1,245 0.4% 16
1984 74.5% 3,121 25.2% 1,055 0.4% 15
1980 70.3% 3,129 28.6% 1,274 1.1% 47
1976 59.4% 2,363 39.9% 1,588 0.8% 30
1972 77.0% 2,941 21.9% 835 1.1% 42
1968 66.5% 2,637 17.4% 691 16.1% 639
1964 60.9% 1,555 39.0% 2,429 0.2% 8
1960 78.7% 3,656 21.3% 992 0.0% 0
1956 73.2% 3,303 26.6% 1,202 0.2% 8
1952 71.9% 2,996 27.8% 1,157 0.3% 12
1948 67.1% 2,494 29.7% 1,105 3.2% 118
1944 74.3% 3,354 25.5% 1,153 0.2% 7
1940 68.4% 3,163 31.5% 1,455 0.1% 6
1936 67.6% 2,594 32.3% 1,237 0.1% 4
1932 59.7% 2,586 40.1% 1,736 0.2% 9
1928 85.1% 3,942 14.8% 684 0.2% 7
1924 68.2% 2,644 30.4% 1,177 1.5% 57
1920 75.0% 4,097 24.8% 1,356 0.2% 13
1916 67.3% 2,456 31.8% 1,158 0.9% 33
1912 35.8% 1,070 29.4% 879 34.8% 1,041

TransportationEdit

For much of its history, Butler County's main line of transportation was the Green River. As railroads became more important economically, the county compensated by building a series of roads to major trade centers such as U.S. 231 connecting Beaver Dam with Owensboro. Green River was eventually closed to traffic after Woodbury's Lock and Dam Number 4 washed out in 1965 and Rochester's Lock and Dam Number 3 was abandoned by the United States Army Corps of Engineers in 1980. Completion of the William H. Natcher Parkway linked the area to the national interstate system in 1970.[3]

MediaEdit

Radio stationsEdit

  • WLBQ-AM 1570 / W268CE FM 101.5 - BeechTree Radio
  • WWKN-FM 99.1

NewspaperEdit

Sites and events of interestEdit

Sites include:

  • Charles Black City Park - Helm Lane off Kentucky Route 70, Morgantown. It offers baseball and soccer fields, basketball and tennis courts; access free of charge. It is also the home to the Morgantown City Pool, which has a minimal charge for use.
  • Cedar Ridge Speedway, two miles west of Morgantown along KY 70, is a venue for local racing leagues.
  • Green River Museum, Woodbury
  • The Corner Market in Roundhill, Junction of State routes 70 and 185 on the Butler-Edmonson County line.
  • Big Reedy Christian Camp, D Simpson Road off KY 185, Reedyville.

Events include:

  • Green River Catfish Festival (annual event) - Charles Black City Park and various locations; late June/early July Features a carnival, various contests, concerts, and tournaments. A fireworks display on July 4 is also included.

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/21/21031.html. Retrieved March 5, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. https://web.archive.org/web/20110531210815/http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b c d Kleber, John E., ed (1992). "Butler County". The Kentucky Encyclopedia. Associate editors: Thomas D. Clark, Lowell H. Harrison, and James C. Klotter. Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0-8131-1772-0. 
  4. ^ Funkhouser, W.D., and W.S. Webb. "Archaeological Survey of Kentucky: Butler County". University of Kentucky Reports in Anthropology 2 (1932): 56-58.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_21.txt. Retrieved August 12, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/tables.2016.html. Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. http://www.webcitation.org/6YSasqtfX?url=http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. Retrieved August 12, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. Retrieved August 12, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ky190090.txt. Retrieved August 12, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. Retrieved August 12, 2014. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. https://web.archive.org/web/20130911234518/http://factfinder2.census.gov/. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  12. ^ Connelly, Thomas Lawrence; Army of the Heartland: The Army of Tennessee, 1861-1862, p. 69 ISBN 080712737X
  13. ^ Copeland, James E.; ‘Where Were the Kentucky Unionists and Secessionists’; The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, volume 71, no. 4 (October, 1973), pp. 344-363
  14. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  15. ^ "Wabash Valley College roster". National Junior College Athletic Association. 2013. Archived from the original on December 3, 2013. https://web.archive.org/web/20131203034003/http://www.njcaa.org/colleges_college_player.cfm?sid=7&collegeid=1585&category=Roster&slid=3&teamid=86166&athleteid=242340. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  16. ^ a b Kentucky Historical Society, Historical Hwy Marker program

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 37°13′N 86°41′W / 37.21, -86.68


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Butler County, Kentucky. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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