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Crockett County, Texas
Crockett County Courthouse
The Crockett County Courthouse in Ozona (2014)
Map of Texas highlighting Crockett County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of USA TX
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1891
Named for Davy Crockett
Seat Ozona
Largest community Ozona
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

2,807 sq mi (7,270 km²)
2,807 sq mi (7,270 km²)
0.02 sq mi (0 km²), 0.0%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

3,719
1.3/sq mi (1/km²)
Congressional district 23rd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.crockett.tx.us

Crockett County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,719.[1] The county seat is Ozona.[2] The county was founded in 1875 and later organized in 1891.[3] It is named in honor of Davy Crockett, the legendary frontiersman who died at the Battle of the Alamo.

HistoryEdit

  • Prehistoric people live in Gobbler Shelter, located on a small tributary canyon of Live Oak Creek. Earliest known Native American tribes are Tonkawa, Lipan Apache and Comanche.[4]
  • 1590 Spanish explorer Gaspar Castaño de Sosa[5] leads a mining expedition of 170 who pass through the western section of Crockett County to reach the Pecos River.
  • 1684, May 22 - Juan Domínguez de Mendoza and his expedition cross the Pecos River and camp at San Pantaleón.[6]
  • 1849 John Coffee Hays expedition charting waterholes for transporting people and freight.[7]
  • 1852 U. S. Army Colonel Joseph K. Mansfield recommends establishing a new post on Live Oak Creek to protect travelers.[4]
  • 1855, August 20, Fort Lancaster is established in response to Mansfield’s recommendation.[8]
  • 1866 The Texas legislature provides three battalions of Texas Rangers to protect settlers in the area.[9]
  • 1868 Camp Melvin established.[10]
  • 1875, January 12 - Crockett County, named for Davy Crockett, is formed from Bexar County.[4]
  • 1880’s Sheep and cattle ranchers establish themselves in the county. Kirkpatrick Hotel built to serve stagecoach passengers and cowboys.[4]
  • 1885 W. P. Hoover becomes one of the first settlers, on the Pecos River. Crockett County becomes a subsidiary of Val Verde County.[4]
  • 1887 Crockett County is further reduced as Sutton and Schleicher counties are formed from it.[4]
  • 1889 Emerald becomes first town in Crockett County.[4]
  • 1891 Crockett County is organized. Ozona becomes the county seat. The first water well is drilled at the First Baptist Church in Ozona.[4]
  • 1900 Stagecoach service begins in Crockett County. County reports seven manufacturing firms.[4]
  • 1902 Crockett County Courthouse built, Empire style, architect Oscar Ruffini. The building does multiple duty for courtroom and county offices, as well as a community center and dance hall.[11]
  • 1925 First producing oil well on L. P. Powell's ranch in north central Crockett County.[4]
  • 1938 Ozona erects a statue of Davy Crockett in the town square.[12]
  • 1939 Ozona opens the Crockett County Museum. In 1958, it was moved to its current location on the town square.[13]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,807 square miles (7,270 km2), virtually all of which is land.[14]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

Crockett County is among the few counties in the United States to border as many as nine counties.

DemographicsEdit

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1880 127
1890 194 52.8%
1900 1,591 720.1%
1910 1,296 −18.5%
1920 1,500 15.7%
1930 2,590 72.7%
1940 2,809 8.5%
1950 3,981 41.7%
1960 4,209 5.7%
1970 3,885 −7.7%
1980 4,608 18.6%
1990 4,078 −11.5%
2000 4,099 0.5%
2010 3,719 −9.3%
Est. 2016 3,675 [15] −10.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[16]
1850–2010[17] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[18] of 2000, there were 4,099 people, 1,524 households, and 1,114 families residing in the county. The population density was 1.46 people per square mile (0.56/km²). There were 2,049 housing units at an average density of 0.73 per square mile (0.28/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 76.34% White, 0.68% Black or African American, 0.59% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 19.71% from other races, and 2.39% from two or more races. 54.70% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,524 households out of which 36.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.30% were married couples living together, 9.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.90% were non-families. 24.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.90% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 24.70% from 45 to 64, and 12.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,355, and the median income for a family was $34,653. Males had a median income of $29,925 versus $14,695 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,414. About 14.90% of families and 19.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.30% of those under age 18 and 18.20% of those age 65 or over.

CommunitiesEdit

Census-designated placeEdit

Ghost TownEdit

There are no incorporated municipalities in Crockett County.

PoliticsEdit

Presidential Elections Results[19]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 70.3% 980 26.7% 372 3.1% 43
2012 65.7% 957 32.9% 480 1.4% 20
2008 66.4% 1,026 33.1% 512 0.5% 7
2004 72.2% 1,248 27.4% 473 0.4% 7
2000 66.1% 924 33.4% 467 0.5% 7
1996 46.0% 714 44.0% 684 10.0% 155
1992 37.9% 623 39.7% 653 22.4% 369
1988 51.2% 932 48.4% 881 0.3% 6
1984 65.0% 1,094 35.0% 589 0.1% 1
1980 59.2% 885 39.8% 595 0.9% 14
1976 49.9% 802 50.0% 804 0.1% 2
1972 72.1% 851 27.9% 329
1968 37.5% 509 42.0% 571 20.5% 279
1964 33.8% 409 66.0% 799 0.3% 3
1960 54.9% 635 44.7% 517 0.4% 4
1956 69.6% 702 30.2% 305 0.2% 2
1952 68.1% 654 31.9% 306
1948 23.3% 127 73.4% 400 3.3% 18
1944 22.8% 112 65.7% 323 11.6% 57
1940 23.9% 132 76.1% 420
1936 24.4% 75 75.0% 231 0.7% 2
1932 33.8% 168 66.2% 329
1928 82.0% 291 18.0% 64
1924 61.5% 112 37.9% 69 0.6% 1
1920 46.8% 80 52.1% 89 1.2% 2
1916 18.6% 16 75.6% 65 5.8% 5
1912 8.1% 5 85.5% 53 6.5% 4

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/48/48105.html. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. https://web.archive.org/web/20110531210815/http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/TX_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Smith, Julia Cauble. "Crockett County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hcc26. Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  5. ^ Chipman, Donald E. "Gaspar Castaño de Sosa". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fca87. Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  6. ^ Weddle, Robert S. "Juan Domínguez de Mendoza". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fdo52. Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  7. ^ Crockett County Historical Society (1976). A History of Crockett County (Texas). Anchor Publishing. p. 22. 
  8. ^ Parent, Laurence (1997). Official Guide to Texas State Parks. University of Texas Press. p. 16. ISBN 978-0-292-76575-7. 
  9. ^ Blackburn Jr, Edward A (2005). Wanted: Historic County Jails of Texas. TAMU Press. pp. 88–89. ISBN 978-1-58544-308-6. 
  10. ^ Smith, Julia Cauble. "Camp Melvin". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/qbcpp. Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  11. ^ "Crockett County Courthouse". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. http://www.texasescapes.com/WestTexasTowns/OzonaTexas/Crockett-County-Courthouse-Ozona-Texas.htm. Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  12. ^ "Davy Crockett Monument". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC.. http://www.texasescapes.com/WestTexasTowns/OzonaTexas/OzonaTx.htm#statue. Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  13. ^ Brochure, Crockett County Museum, Ozona, Texas
  14. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_48.txt. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/tables.2016.html. Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  16. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. http://www.webcitation.org/6YSasqtfX?url=http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010". Texas Almanac. http://texasalmanac.com/sites/default/files/images/topics/ctypophistweb2010.pdf. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  18. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. https://web.archive.org/web/20130911234518/http://factfinder2.census.gov/. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  19. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

External linksEdit

Template:Davy Crockett

Coordinates: 30°44′N 101°25′W / 30.73, -101.41


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Crockett County, Texas. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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