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Dawson County, Georgia
Dawson County Courthouse, Georgia
Dawson County Courthouse in Dawsonville
Map of Georgia highlighting Dawson County
Location in the state of Georgia (U.S. state)
Map of USA GA
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1857
Named for William Crosby Dawson
Seat Dawsonville
Largest city Dawsonville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

214 sq mi (554 km²)
211 sq mi (546 km²)
3.6 sq mi (9 km²), 1.7%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

22,330
106/sq mi (41/km²)
Congressional district 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.dawsoncounty.org/

Dawson County is a county located in the north central portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,330.[1] The county seat is Dawsonville.[2]

Dawson County is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

HistoryEdit

Dawson County was created on December 3, 1857 from Gilmer and Lumpkin counties. It is named for William Crosby Dawson, a U.S. Senator from Georgia.[3]

Civil WarEdit

The 1860s brought war and hardships to the people of Dawson County. The men of Dawson County answered the call and went to fight in the Civil War. The following Confederate units were raised in Dawson County:

21st Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company E Concord Rangers

22nd Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company I, Dawson County Independents

38th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company I (Wright's Legion), Dawson Farmers

38th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company L (Wright's Legion)

52nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Company I

The following Union units were raised in Dawson County:

1st Georgia Infantry Battalion (Union), Companies B and C

Post Civil War

The county is known in auto racing circles for its long tradition of involvement in the sport as many of the original NASCAR racers were from this area. Many racing skills originally developed as a consequence of running moonshine down highway 9 to Atlanta, also known as Thunder Road. Celebrations of Dawson County's history and of its involvement occur every October with the Moonshine Festival.

Locals have referred to Dawson County as the Moonshine Capital of the World. This title is claimed by many other areas but is fiercely defended by residents of the area. This is due to the secluded area and the ability to move so much moonshine to the larger cities, especially Atlanta.

Education Edit

Dawson County currently serves grades K-12. It has a total of 7 schools, 1 solely for Pre-K, 3 being for grades K-5, 1 being for grades 6-7, 1 being for grades 8-9, and 1 being for grades 9-12.

Dawson Head Start Pre-K

Blacks Mill Elementary School (K-5)

Kilough Elementary School (K-5)

Riverview Elementary School (K-5)

Dawson County Middle School (6-7)

Dawson County Junior High School (8-9)

Dawson County High School (10-12)

Geography Edit

Amicalola Falls 02

Amicalola Falls

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 214 square miles (550 km2), of which 211 square miles (550 km2) is land and 3.6 square miles (9.3 km2) (1.7%) is water.[4]

Part of Lake Lanier is in the southeastern part of the county and the boundary line with neighboring counties pass through the lake. The 729-foot (222 m) Amicalola Falls, are located in the county. The Amicalola Falls are the highest in Georgia, the tallest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River and are one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia. The highest point in the county is Black Mountain, with an elevation of 3,600 feet (1,100 m). 6,760 acres (27.36 km2), which is located in the Chattahoochee National Forest. The Chestatee and Etowah rivers flow through Dawson County.

The vast majority of Dawson County is located in the Etowah River sub-basin of the ACT River Basin (Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basin). The southeastern tip of the county is located in the Upper Chattahoochee River sub-basin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin), and a very small northern section of Dawson County is located in the Coosawattee River sub-basin of the larger ACT River Basin.[5]

Major highwaysEdit

Secondary HighwaysEdit

  • Cowart Road
  • Steve Tate Highway
  • Burnt Mountain Road (Old SR 108)
  • Dawson Forest Road (Old SR 318)
  • Lumpkin Campground Road (Old SR 9E)
  • Harmony Church Road (Old SR 9E)
  • Auraria Road (Old SR 9E)
  • Keith Evans Road (Old SR 342)
  • Bailey Waters Road (Old SR 342)
  • Shoal Creek Road (Old SR 136 Spur)
  • Nix Bridge Road (Old SR 226)

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areaEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1860 3,856
1870 4,369 13.3%
1880 5,837 33.6%
1890 5,612 −3.9%
1900 5,442 −3.0%
1910 4,686 −13.9%
1920 4,204 −10.3%
1930 3,502 −16.7%
1940 4,479 27.9%
1950 3,712 −17.1%
1960 3,590 −3.3%
1970 3,639 1.4%
1980 4,774 31.2%
1990 9,429 97.5%
2000 15,999 69.7%
2010 22,330 39.6%
Est. 2016 23,604 [6] 47.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[11] of 2010, there were 22,330 people, and 10,425 households, and 6,390 families residing in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 95.62% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.6% Asian, <0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.6% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. 4.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 8,433 households out of which 21.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 24.2% were non-families. 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals living alone and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county, the population was spread out with 5.7% under the age of 5, 6.5% between 5–9 years, 6.8% between 10–14 years, 6.0% between 15–19 years, 6.1% between 20–24 years, 5.7% between 25–29 years, 5.8% between 30–34 years, 6.6% between 35–39 years, 6.9% between 40–44 years, 8.1% between 45–49 years, 7.2% between 50–54 years, 7.0% between 55–59 years, 7.6% between 60–64 years, 6.0% between 65–69 years, 3.6% between 70–74 years, 2.4% between 75–79 years, 1.3% between 80–84 years, and 0.8 over age 85. The median age was 40.6 years. 50% (11,164) were male, and 50% (11,166) were female.

The median income for a household in the county was estimated $51,989, and the median income for a family was estimated $60,455. About 8.9% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.[12]

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 22,330 people, 8,433 households, and 6,390 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 105.9 inhabitants per square mile (40.9 /km2). There were 10,425 housing units at an average density of 49.4 per square mile (19.1 /km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 95.6% white, 0.6% Asian, 0.5% black or African American, 0.4% American Indian, 1.6% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.1% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 18.9% were American, 18.8% were Irish, 14.7% were English, and 13.6% were German.[15]

Of the 8,433 households, 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 24.2% were non-families, and 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 2.97. The median age was 40.6 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $51,128 and the median income for a family was $60,236. Males had a median income of $41,726 versus $31,978 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,557. About 7.8% of families and 12.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Cities and CommunitiesEdit

Incorporated CitiesEdit

Unincorporated CommunitiesEdit

Private CommunitiesEdit

There are large, gated private communities that function similar to a municipality providing many municipal-type services that operate independent of county government.

  • Paradise Valley Resort (a private residential/recreational community)

PoliticsEdit

Previous Presidential Elections Results[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 83.8% 9,900 12.3% 1,448 4.0% 472
2012 86.2% 8,847 12.1% 1,241 1.7% 176
2008 82.5% 8,242 16.3% 1,632 1.1% 112
2004 81.9% 6,649 17.3% 1,407 0.8% 65
2000 71.4% 4,210 24.7% 1,458 3.9% 230
1996 54.4% 2,343 33.3% 1,434 12.3% 529
1992 43.6% 1,696 36.0% 1,399 20.5% 797
1988 71.0% 1,908 28.3% 761 0.6% 17
1984 67.3% 1,322 32.7% 643
1980 39.7% 729 58.4% 1,072 2.0% 36
1976 21.1% 370 78.9% 1,384
1972 78.3% 828 21.7% 230
1968 31.8% 509 15.4% 246 52.8% 845
1964 40.7% 639 59.3% 932
1960 30.5% 401 69.6% 916
1956 46.0% 613 54.1% 721
1952 37.9% 470 62.1% 770
style="text-align:center; Template:Party shading/Dixiecrat|1948 2.8% 42 44.4% 660 52.8% 786
1944 42.2% 342 57.8% 469
1940 36.2% 276 63.4% 484 0.4% 3
1936 46.1% 322 53.9% 377
1932 15.5% 105 83.9% 567 0.6% 4
1928 46.6% 290 53.4% 332
1924 48.4% 264 51.1% 279 0.6% 3
1920 58.2% 354 41.8% 254
1916 3.9% 29 59.3% 440 36.8% 273
1912 45.5% 161 48.0% 170 6.5% 23

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 9, 2011. https://www.webcitation.org/603EqkNkQ?url=http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/13/13085.html. Retrieved February 15, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. https://web.archive.org/web/20110531210815/http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off.. pp. 101. https://books.google.com/books?id=9V1IAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA101#v=onepage&q&f=false. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. http://www.gaswcc.org/maps/. Retrieved 2015-11-19. 
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/tables.2016.html. Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. https://www.webcitation.org/6YSasqtfX?url=http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. Retrieved June 21, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ga190090.txt. Retrieved June 21, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. Retrieved June 21, 2014. 
  11. ^ http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_DP_DPDP1
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-09-16. https://web.archive.org/web/20130916224703/http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_5YR_DP03. Retrieved 2013-11-21. 
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US13085. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US13085. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US13085. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US13085. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  17. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 34°26′N 84°10′W / 34.44, -84.17


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Dawson County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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