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Franklin County, Vermont
StATownHall
St. Albans Town Hall.
Map of Vermont highlighting Franklin County
Location in the state of Vermont
Map of USA VT
Vermont's location in the U.S.
Founded 1796
Named for Benjamin Franklin
Shire Town
Largest city St. Albans
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

692 sq mi (1,792 km²)
634 sq mi (1,642 km²)
58 sq mi (150 km²), 8.4%
PopulationEst.
 - (2015)
 - Density

48,799
76.7/sq mi (30/km²)
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4

Franklin County is a county in the state of Vermont, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 47,746.[1] Its county seat is the city of St. Albans.[2] It borders the Canadian province of Quebec. The county was created in 1792 and organized in 1796.[3][4] Franklin County is part of the Burlington metropolitan area.

HistoryEdit

Franklin County is one of several Vermont counties created from land originally ceded by the state of New York on January 15, 1777 when Vermont declared itself to be a state distinct from New York.[5][6][7] The land originally was contested by Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Netherland, but it remained undelineated until July 20, 1764, when King George III established the boundary between New Hampshire and New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts and south of the parallel of 45 degrees north latitude. New York assigned the land gained to Albany County.[8][9] On March 12, 1772 Albany County was partitioned to create Charlotte County,[10] and this situation remained until Vermont's independence from New York and Britain. However, this did not end the contest.

On September 3, 1783, as a result of the signing of the Treaty of Paris the Revolutionary War ended with Great Britain recognizing the independence of the United States. Vermont's border with Quebec was established at 45 degrees north latitude.[11][12] In 1792, Franklin County was formed from part of Chittenden County.[4]

The county's namesake is Benjamin Franklin.[13]

in 2008, the federal government declared the county a disaster area after severe storms and flooding June 14–17.[14]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 692 square miles (1,790 km2), of which 634 square miles (1,640 km2) is land and 58 square miles (150 km2) (8.4%) is water.[15]

Adjacent counties and municipalitiesEdit

National protected areaEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1800 8,282
1810 16,615 100.6%
1820 17,192 3.5%
1830 24,525 42.7%
1840 24,531 0%
1850 28,586 16.5%
1860 27,231 −4.7%
1870 30,291 11.2%
1880 30,225 −0.2%
1890 29,755 −1.6%
1900 30,198 1.5%
1910 29,866 −1.1%
1920 30,026 0.5%
1930 29,975 −0.2%
1940 29,601 −1.2%
1950 29,894 1.0%
1960 29,474 −1.4%
1970 31,282 6.1%
1980 34,788 11.2%
1990 39,980 14.9%
2000 45,417 13.6%
2010 47,746 5.1%
Est. 2016 48,915 [16] 7.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[17]
1790–1960[18] 1900–1990[19]
1990–2000[20] 2010–2014[1]

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 47,746 people, 18,513 households, and 12,939 families residing in the county.[21] The population density was 75.3 inhabitants per square mile (29.1 /km2). There were 21,588 housing units at an average density of 34.1 per square mile (13.2 /km2).[22] Of the 18,513 households, 34.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.1% were non-families, and 22.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.97. The median age was 39.6 years.[21]

The median income for a household in the county was $53,623 and the median income for a family was $63,009. Males had a median income of $43,155 versus $36,940 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,767. About 7.2% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.8% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.[23]

PoliticsEdit

Presidential Elections Results[24]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 40.9% 8,752 43.7% 9,351 15.5% 3,308
2012 37.2% 7,405 60.6% 12,057 2.1% 426
2008 36.6% 7,853 61.4% 13,179 2.0% 428
2004 44.9% 8,936 53.2% 10,598 1.9% 386
2000 43.7% 8,395 49.6% 9,514 6.7% 1,285
1996 28.5% 4,617 54.2% 8,790 17.3% 2,799
1992 29.3% 5,484 42.7% 8,004 28.1% 5,263
1988 49.2% 7,293 49.7% 7,372 1.1% 169
1984 59.6% 8,683 39.5% 5,755 0.9% 124
1980 44.6% 5,998 44.0% 5,914 11.4% 1,533
1976 51.6% 6,190 46.8% 5,610 1.6% 186
1972 67.2% 8,109 32.3% 3,898 0.5% 58
1968 44.7% 5,218 51.6% 6,027 3.7% 436
1964 27.0% 3,261 73.0% 8,823 0.0% 2
1960 43.7% 5,444 56.4% 7,028
1956 59.6% 7,125 40.5% 4,840
1952 57.8% 6,949 41.8% 5,018 0.4% 51
1948 46.9% 4,897 52.2% 5,455 0.9% 92
1944 42.0% 4,374 58.0% 6,036 0.0% 1
1940 41.2% 5,258 58.3% 7,439 0.5% 63
1936 44.6% 5,507 55.2% 6,817 0.3% 36
1932 44.3% 4,999 54.8% 6,179 1.0% 108
1928 52.2% 6,031 47.4% 5,477 0.4% 40
1924 67.1% 4,594 24.1% 1,649 8.8% 604
1920 66.7% 4,869 32.1% 2,342 1.2% 87
1916 56.4% 2,796 42.5% 2,107 1.1% 54
1912 33.2% 1,433 30.5% 1,317 36.4% 1,571
1908 66.8% 2,360 29.7% 1,048 3.5% 123
1904 72.2% 2,522 25.2% 881 2.6% 89
1900 66.4% 2,738 31.9% 1,316 1.7% 71
1896 72.2% 3,444 24.1% 1,150 3.8% 179
1892 63.2% 2,540 33.7% 1,353 3.1% 125
1888 67.3% 3,121 29.0% 1,343 3.7% 171

EconomyEdit

Personal incomeEdit

The median income for a household in the county was $41,659, and the median income for a family was $46,733. Males had a median income of $32,009 versus $24,078 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,816. About 7.00% of families and 9.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.40% of those under age 18 and 10.30% of those age 65 or over.

IndustryEdit

In 2009, the county had the most dairy farms in the state, 239 out of 1,078.[25]

CommunitiesEdit

CityEdit

TownsEdit

VillagesEdit

Villages are census divisions, but have no separate corporate existence from the towns they are in.

Census-designated placesEdit

See also Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/50/50011.html. Retrieved December 30, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. https://web.archive.org/web/20110531210815/http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Vermont: Individual County Chronologies". The Newberry Library. 2008. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/VT_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Aldrich, Lewis Cass (1891). History of Franklin and Grand Isle counties, Vermont. Syracuse, NY: D. Mason & Co.. https://archive.org/stream/cu31924028837544/cu31924028837544_djvu.txt. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  5. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. P. 70-73.
  6. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 64.
  7. ^ Williamson, Chilton. Vermont in Quandary: 1763-1825. Growth of Vermont series, Number 4. Montpelier: Vermont Historical Series, 1949. PP. 82-84; map facing 95, 100-102, 112-113.
  8. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. P. 13-19.
  9. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 63.
  10. ^ New York Colonial Laws, Chapter 1534; Section 5; Paragraph 321)
  11. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 12.
  12. ^ Parry, Clive, ed. Consolidated Treaty Series. 231 Volumes. Dobbs Ferry, New York; Oceana Publications, 1969-1981. Volume 48; pp. 481; 487; 491-492.
  13. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off.. pp. 131. https://books.google.com/books?id=9V1IAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA131#v=onepage&q&f=false. 
  14. ^ Sutkoski, Matt (August 1, 2008). Summer has been wet one for the ages. Burlington Free Press. 
  15. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_50.txt. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/tables.2016.html. Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  17. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. http://www.webcitation.org/6YSasqtfX?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.census.gov%2Fprod%2Fwww%2Fdecennial.html. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  18. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  19. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/vt190090.txt. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  20. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  21. ^ a b "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US50011. Retrieved 2016-01-20. 
  22. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US50011. Retrieved 2016-01-20. 
  23. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US50011. Retrieved 2016-01-20. 
  24. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  25. ^ Lefebvre, Paul (February 11, 2009). Average Vermont farmer expected to lose $92,000. the Chronicle. 

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 44°52′N 72°55′W / 44.86, -72.91


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Franklin County, Vermont. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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