Jackson County, Oregon

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Jackson County, Oregon
Map of Oregon highlighting Jackson County
Location in the state of Oregon
Map of USA OR
Oregon's location in the U.S.
Founded January 12, 1852
Seat Medford
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

2,802 sq mi (7,257 km²)
2,785 sq mi (7,213 km²)
17 sq mi (44 km²), 0.86%
 - (2000)
 - Density

65/sq mi (25/km²)

Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oregon. In 2000, its population was 181,269. It is named for Andrew Jackson the seventh president of the United States. The seat of the county is Medford.

Economy Edit

The county's principal industries are agriculture, lumber, manufacturing, and tourism.

Jackson County has over 10,000 acres (40 km²) of orchards and shares with Josephine County the Rogue Valley and Applegate wine appellations.

Soapstone, a substance used in art sculpture, is mined in Jackson County. [1]


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 7,257 km² (2,802 sq mi). 7,214 km² (2,785 sq mi) of it is land and 43 km² (17 sq mi) of it (0.59%) is water.

Adjacent Counties Edit


As of the census² of 2000, there were 181,269 people, 71,532 households, and 48,427 families residing in the county. The population density was 25/km² (65/sq mi). There were 75,737 housing units at an average density of 10/km² (27/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 91.65% White, 0.40% Black or African American, 1.09% Native American, 0.90% Asian, 0.18% Pacific Islander, 2.88% from other races, and 2.91% from two or more races. 6.69% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 17.4% were of German, 12.9% English, 10.2% Irish and 8.8% United States or American ancestry according to Census 2000. 92.7% spoke English and 5.6% Spanish as their first language.

Of the 71,532 households, 30.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.20% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.30% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.40% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 25.50% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 16.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,461, and the median income for a family was $43,675. Males had a median income of $32,720 versus $23,690 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,498. About 8.90% of families and 12.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.30% of those under age 18 and 6.90% of those age 65 or over.


Modoc, Shasta, Takelma, Latgawas, and Umpqua Indian tribes are all native to the present boundaries of Jackson County. In the early 1850s, both the Klickitats from the north and the Deschutes from the south raided and settled the area.

The Territorial Legislature created Jackson County on January 12, 1852, from the southwestern portion of Lane County and the unorganized area south of Douglas and Umpqua Counties. It included lands which now lie in Coos, Curry, Josephine, Klamath and Lake Counties. Gold discoveries in the Rogue and Illinois River valleys near Jacksonville in 1852 and the completion of a wagon road connecting the county with California to the south and Douglas County to the north led to an influx of non-native settlers.

Conflict between the miners and Native Americans led to war in 1853, which continued intermittently until the final defeat of the last band under chiefs John and George by a combined force of regular army and civilians May 29, 1856 at Big Bend on the Illinois River. The Native Americans had received the worse of the fighting throughout this conflict, and as they began to surrender, they were herded to existing reservations, beginning in January, 1856 when one group was marched to the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation west of Salem. Over the following months, other groups were forced to leave until by May, 1857 almost all of the Shasta, Takelma, and Latgawas tribes had been relocated to the Siletz Reservation, where they remained.

Jacksonville was designated as the first county seat in 1853. However, Jacksonville declined due to diminishing returns in the local goldfields and the construction in the 1880s of the Oregon and California Railroad. This railroad bypassed Jacksonville and rather went near Medford, located five miles east of Jacksonville. Medford's prospects increased precipitously because of the location of the railroad and the accompanying commerce and development as Jacksonville continued its steady decline. Jacksonville fended off suggestions to move the county seat until 1927 when Medford was finally selected as the county seat.

In March of 2004, Jackson County became the first of an eventual 35 counties to implement a voluntary plan of fireproofing homes situated on properties zoned as part of the forestland-urban interface. This requires homeowners to maintain a 30' or greater firebreak around their structures, and affects 12,000 homeowners. In 2007 this plan becomes mandatory for many landowners, under threat of liability if their property is involved in a fire.

On May 15, 2007, residents voted not to reopen the county's 15 libraries, which have been closed since April 6 due to a shortage of funds. This was the second time that residents have voted not to fund the libraries. [2] This was the largest library closure in the history of the United States. [3] The libraries were reopened, with reduced hours, on October 24, 2007 [4].


Incorporated citiesEdit

Unincorporated communities and CDPsEdit

See alsoEdit


External linksEdit

Coordinates: 42°25′N 122°44′W / 42.42, -122.74

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Jackson County, Oregon. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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