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John Jacob Lindauer (1840-1888)

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John Jacob Lindauer
Sex: Male
Birth: 1840 (176 years ago)
Pennsylvania
Death: January 5, 1888 (age 48)
Jersey City, New Jersey
Burial: Cypress Hills Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York
Father: Oscar Arthur Moritz Lindauer (1815-1866)
Mother: Sophia Weber (1815-1891) (stepmother)
Siblings: Charles Frederick Lindauer I (1835-1921)
Louis Julius Lindauer (1842-1915)
Eloise Lindauer I (1852-1944)
Spouse/Partner: Nellie X (1853-1887) of Massachusetts
Marriage: circa 1860 at age 20 (147 years ago)
Children: They appear to have raised
the children of Caroline Ritter (1846-?):
George Lindauer (1867-?)
Charlotte Lindauer (1869-1894)
Clara Louise Lindauer (1871-?)
Oscar Arthur Lindauer (1873-1948)
Edwin Lindauer (1874-?)
Lindauer-OscarArthurMoritz 02d

Lindauer Ensko bible

Lindauer-JohnJacob 1888 death

Death indexed in Familysearch

CypressHill 3049162146 9ea116d4a8 o original

Cypress Hill cemetery burials

Lindauer-OscarArthurMoritz cemetery 05

Cypress Hill cemetery plot

John Jacob Lindauer (1840-1888) described himself as a "policy dealer", which was a man who ran the numbers game. He ran a policy shop in New York City with his brother Louis. His other brother, Charles also ran a policy shop. He also listed himself as a cigar maker with Lindauer and Company, Tobacco. (b. 1840; Pennsylvania, USA - d. January 5, 1888; Jersey City, New Jersey, USA)

ParentsEdit

BirthEdit

He was born in 1840 in Pennsylvania. His birth record has not been located. There was no civil registration until 1905, only church records recorded births.

SiblingsEdit

Philadelphia to New York CityEdit

John's parents moved from Philadelphia to New York City around 1845-1850.

MarriageEdit

Around 1860 John married Nellie X (1853-1887). Nellie was born in Massachusetts. The exact year of the marriage has not been found yet. They did not have any biological children but they raised the children of Charles and Caroline.

ChildrenEdit

The following children appear starting in the 1880 United States Census. John and Nellie appear to have have raised the children of Caroline Ritter (1846-?) and Charles F. Lindauer (1840) from the 1870 United States Census. It is not known if Charles is the same person as Charles Frederick Lindauer I (1835-1921). All the children were born in New York City.

US v. John Lindauer (1869)Edit

"Lottery Ticket Dealers. United States Circuit Court, Southern District of New York. Before Judge Benedict and a Jury. U. S. v. John Lindauer. This was an indictment charging the defendant with doing business as a lottery dealer at No. 202 Chrystie-street, without paying the special tax required by law. From the evidence it did not appear clear whether he was pecuniarily interested in the profits and losses of the business. Lewis Lindauer, the brother of the defendant, testified that he (Lewis) paid the rent of the lottery office, and that the defendant merely received wages for his services. On the other hand it was shown that the defendant had made statements to the effect that he was interested in the business. Judge Benedict charged that if the defendant was found to be simply a clerk, he must be acquitted; and further charge that a person might sell lottery tickets on commission, if the commission was allowed as wages, and still be merely a clerk, and not be amenable in the eye of the law as being engaged or concerned in the business of lottery dealing. This construction of the law is very important in view of the great number of arrests of lottery-ticket vendors that have recently taken place, nearly all of whom claim to be clerks, and it being extremely difficult to prove who are the principals. The jury, after a brief absence, found the defendant not guilty."

Manhattan, New YorkEdit

In 1869 John was listed in the Manhattan city directory as a "broker" with his brother, Charles Frederick Lindauer. Both were working at 148 Mercer Street, and both were living at 165 Spring Street in Manhattan. There was also a "John Lindauer", born in 1840, in the 1870 Census in Manhattan married to an "Elizabeth". The 1870 Census lists John Lindauer as born in New York and working as a "policy dealer". It is possible there are two John Lindauers born roughly the same time, both living in Manhattan.

Jersey City, New JerseyEdit

John appears in the 1880 US Census living in Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey under the name "John Lindauner" and working as a "cigar maker". In 1881 John was listed as a "cigar maker" in the Jersey City directory, where he is living or working at 172 Railroad Avenue. His two brothers were also listed in the directory dealing in cigars.

DeathEdit

John died on January 5, 1888 in Jersey City, New Jersey and his death was recorded in the Lindauer family bible, which is now archived with Eloise Ensko Higgins (1950) in Lawrenceville, New Jersey.

BurialEdit

John Lindauer and Nellie were both buried in Cypress Hills Cemetery in Brooklyn in the Lindauer family plot.

Lindauer & Company, TobacconistsEdit

On June 02, 1889, the Brooklyn Eagle reported the following "News from Jersey City: "August Mueller, who was the collector in this city for Lindauer & Company, tobacconist, was sent to jail this morning for contempt of court. His employers were dissatisfied with his returns and had a receiver appointed to examine his accounts. Mueller refused to surrender his books and his arrest followed."

LegacyEdit

No picture of him is known to exist. He has living descendants though his son Oscar Arthur Lindauer (1873-1948). Others may exist through his daughters. His birth, marriage, and death certificates have not been located.

Research on John LindauerEdit

Norton children hypothesisEdit

Researcher Richard Arthur Norton proposes: The children being raised by John Jacob Lindauer (1840-1888) belong to Caroline Ritter (1846-?) as their birth mother and "Charles Lindauer" as their father. The best theory to date is that John raised the children of Charles and Caroline after her death. John Jacob Lindauer and Nellie appear in the 1870 census without any children. By the 1880 census all the children of Caroline Ritter and Charles Lindauer are now living in John and Nellie's household. George Lindauer can't be Nellie's son, she would have had him when she was just 13 years old. The descendants of Oscar Arthur Lindauer (1873-1948) remember that Caroline Ritter (1846-?) was their ancestor. I also believe that the "Charles Lindauer" on the birth certificates is Charles Frederick Lindauer I (1835-1921) with a second family.

Borland children hypothesisEdit

Researcher Kevin Borland proposes that all of these children belonged to Charles Lindauer (c1840-?) and Caroline Ritter (1846-?), and that John Jacob Lindauer and wife Nellie were childless. Evidence in favor of Kevin's proposition includes the following facts:

  • There is a birth record for a Oskar Sorelt Lindauer (22 Dec 1872 Manhattan, New York, New York) on Familysearch.org. The birthdate is nearly identical to that of Oscar Arthur Lindauer, and the parents are listed as Charles Lindauer and Caroline Ritter. Kevin believes that Sorelt is a mis-transcription of Moritz.
  • City directories indicate two different Charles Lindauers living in Manhattan. In the 1869/1870 directory, there is a Charles Lindauer with an exchange business, listed with a home address of 177 Laurens, and a separate Charles F. Lindauer with a brokerage at 148 Mercer and a home address of 165 Spring. John Jacob (listed as John) worked at Charles F.'s brokerage according to the directory, and he resided with Charles F. at 165 Spring. There is a separate listing for a John Lindauer (probably the same as John Jacob) with an exchange at 17 Thompson. No separate home address is given for this John. In the 1870/1871 directory, there is a Charles F. Lindauer residing at 165 Spring with his mother Sophia, listed as a widow of Oscar. There are no other John or Charles Lindauers listed. In the 1871/1872 directory, there is a Charles Lindauer selling beer at 7 Goerck as well as a Charles F. Lindauer with an exchage at 148 Mercer. Charles F. resided at 4 Bedford. There is also a Louis Lindauer with three exchange businesses at 119 Green, 17 Thompson and 96 9th Ave. Louis resided at 106 Waverly Pl. In the 1872/1873 directory, there is a Charles Lindauer selling beer at 187 Stanton. This charles lives at 141 Attorney. Charles F. Lindauer has his brokerage at 148 Mercer and his home at 192 Bleecker. Meanwhile, Louis has an exchange at 119 Greene, while there is a separate listing for Louis J. as a broker at 272 Bowery, with a residence of 13 Charlton. What is important here is that in the 1869/1870 and the 1872/1873 directories, there are clearly two distinct Charles Lindauers, one with the middle initial F. and one without.
  • Descendants of Oscar Lindauer report that Caroline Ritter was their ancestor.
  • There are two separate Charles Lindauers in the 1870 census.
  • The 1860 census does not conflict with this theory. While there were only 1 Charles and 1 John in the 1860 census, the dates of birth are too inaccurate to determine who was living in the household of Oscar A.M. and Sophia. However, either of the Charles Lindauers would have been over 20, and old enough to reside on their own.
  • The Lindauer family appears to freely interchange their name order and provide their children with double middle names (which was common in Germany during this time period). For exampe, see above with regard to Edwin Lindauer, a.k.a. John Edwin Lindauer, a.k.a. Charles Edwin Lindauer. See also Oscar Arthur Lindauer, a.k.a. Oscar Moritz Lindauer, above. See also Oscar Arthur Moritz Lindauer (John's father), a.k.a. August Lindauer. German families of this time period also had no qualms of naming two children with the same first name, as the middle names were used to differentiate the children. (This practice may have also confused the census taker in 1860. Imagine an English speaking census taker listening to information from a German speaking family about their children Charles, John and Charles.)

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