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Madison County, Georgia
Madison County Courthouse
Madison County Courthouse in Danielsville
Map of Georgia highlighting Madison County
Location in the state of Georgia (U.S. state)
Map of USA GA
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded December 5, 1811
Named for James Madison
Seat Danielsville
Largest city Comer
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

286 sq mi (741 km²)
282 sq mi (730 km²)
3.3 sq mi (9 km²), 1.1%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

28,120
100/sq mi (39/km²)
Congressional district 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.madisoncountyga.us/

Madison County is a county located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 28,120.[1] The county seat is Danielsville.[2] The county was created on December 5, 1811. The county's largest city is Comer with a population of 1,200.

Madison County was included in the Athens-Clarke County, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Atlanta-Athens-Clarke County-Sandy Springs, GA Combined Statistical Area.

HistoryEdit

Named for James Madison,[3] fourth president of United States, from 1809 to 1817, Madison County, was organized under act of General Assembly of Georgia, December 11, 1811. It was the 38th county formed in Georgia and began to operate as a county in 1812. Madison County formed from Oglethorpe, Clarke, Jackson, Franklin and Elbert counties.[4]

Early agriculture in Madison County was devoted to food crops and livestock (cattle, hogs and sheep), which was sufficient to feed the population. Just after the Civil War ended, the demand for a cash crop led to a major reliance on cotton.[5] The soils of Madison County were heavily damaged by this cotton monoculture. From the 1930s on, agriculture became more diverse. Today, agribusiness dominates the local economy, with poultry production particularly important.

Madison and Oglethorpe counties share Watson Mill Bridge State Park, the site of the longest covered bridge in Georgia. The bridge, which is over 100 years old, spans 229 feet of the South Fork of the Broad River. There are also facilities for camping, hiking trails, picnicking and fishing in the park.

The Madison County Courthouse, one of the most ornate in Georgia, was built in 1901 for the sum of $18,314. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. New Hope Presbyterian Church, established in 1788, is the third oldest church in Georgia.[6]

Lt. Col. Lemuel Penn, a decorated veteran of World War II and a United States Army Reserve officer, was murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan on July 11, 1964, nine days after passage of the Civil Rights Act, on a Broad River bridge on the Georgia State Route 172 in Madison County.[7][8]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 286 square miles (740 km2), of which 282 square miles (730 km2) is land and 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2) (1.1%) is water.[9]

The vast majority of Madison County is located in the Broad River sub-basin of the Savannah River basin, with just a very small portion of the county's western edge located in the Upper Oconee River sub-basin of the Altamaha River basin.[10]

Adjacent countiesEdit

Major highwaysEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 3,735
1830 4,646 24.4%
1840 4,510 −2.9%
1850 5,703 26.5%
1860 5,933 4.0%
1870 5,227 −11.9%
1880 7,977 52.6%
1890 11,024 38.2%
1900 13,224 20.0%
1910 16,851 27.4%
1920 18,803 11.6%
1930 14,921 −20.6%
1940 13,431 −10.0%
1950 12,238 −8.9%
1960 11,246 −8.1%
1970 13,517 20.2%
1980 17,747 31.3%
1990 21,050 18.6%
2000 25,730 22.2%
2010 28,120 9.3%
Est. 2016 28,824 [11] 12.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2013[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 25,730 people, 9,800 households, and 7,330 families residing in the county. The population density was 91 people per square mile (35/km²). There were 10,520 housing units at an average density of 37 per square mile (14/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 89.01% White, 8.46% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.03% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 1.97% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,800 households out of which 34.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.60% were married couples living together 10.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.20% were non-families. 21.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.30% under the age of 18, 8.20% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 11.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 96.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,347, and the median income for a family was $42,189. Males had a median income of $31,324 versus $22,426 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,998. About 9.20% of families and 11.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.00% of those under age 18 and 16.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 28,120 people, 10,508 households, and 7,804 families residing in the county.[17] The population density was 99.6 inhabitants per square mile (38.5 /km2). There were 11,784 housing units at an average density of 41.7 per square mile (16.1 /km2).[18] The racial makeup of the county was 87.6% white, 8.4% black or African American, 0.6% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 1.9% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.1% of the population.[17] In terms of ancestry, 20.7% were American, 9.1% were Irish, 9.1% were English, and 7.2% were German.[19]

Of the 10,508 households, 35.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.9% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 25.7% were non-families, and 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.07. The median age was 39.4 years.[17]

The median income for a household in the county was $41,343 and the median income for a family was $49,713. Males had a median income of $37,963 versus $28,732 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,975. About 14.7% of families and 17.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.7% of those under age 18 and 18.4% of those age 65 or over.[20]

GovernmentEdit

The citizens of Madison County are represented by an elected six member board of commissioners. Each commissioner represents one of five districts plus a chairman of the board elected at large for the whole county.

Board of Commissioners

  • Chairman - John Scarborough
  • District 1 - Lee Allen
  • District 2 - Tripp Strickland
  • District 3 - Theresa Bettis
  • District 4 - John Pethel, Sr.
  • District 5 - Jim Escoe, Sr.
Previous Presidential Elections Results[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 76.2% 9,201 20.1% 2,425 3.8% 455
2012 75.8% 8,443 22.4% 2,494 1.8% 196
2008 72.4% 8,226 26.1% 2,965 1.5% 174
2004 73.6% 7,254 25.6% 2,527 0.8% 75
2000 69.2% 5,529 28.6% 2,285 2.2% 179
1996 53.4% 3,992 34.4% 2,571 12.2% 913
1992 48.6% 3,351 34.7% 2,393 16.7% 1149
1988 69.1% 3,724 30.4% 1,639 0.5% 26
1984 69.0% 3,768 31.0% 1,690
1980 43.1% 2,330 55.2% 2,980 1.7% 91
1976 24.9% 1,115 75.1% 3,367
1972 82.0% 2,606 18.0% 572
1968 16.0% 600 16.6% 622 67.4% 2,529
1964 33.7% 1,190 66.3% 2,341
1960 7.8% 205 92.2% 2,418
1956 6.8% 161 93.2% 2,222
1952 10.6% 225 89.4% 1,899
1948 14.9% 214 80.6% 1,160 4.5% 65
1944 17.6% 265 82.2% 1,235 0.1% 2
1940 13.6% 185 85.4% 1,160 1.0% 14
1936 18.7% 393 80.9% 1,697 0.4% 8
1932 1.8% 38 97.9% 2,124 0.4% 8
1928 52.7% 527 47.4% 474
1924 17.6% 121 73.5% 504 8.9% 61
1920 28.9% 281 71.2% 693
1916 12.6% 181 86.1% 1,241 1.3% 19
1912 20.2% 146 78.0% 564 1.8% 13

EducationEdit

Madison County public education is served by the Madison County School District. The Madison County Board of Education oversees and operates the public charter school system in the School District. Madison County Board of Education operates 5 elementary schools, 1 middle school, 1 high school and 1 career academy.

The Madison County Board of Education is overseen by 5 elected board members, from 5 districts in the county. The Board appoints a School Superintendent who works at the pleasure of the Board as a whole.

The district has 290 full-time teachers and over 4,621 students

  • District 1 - Robert Hooper (Nov 2007 - Dec 2018)
  • District 2 - Angie McGinnis (Jan 2015 - Dec 2018)
  • District 3 - Cindy Nash (Jan 2013 - Dec 2020)
  • District 4 - Byron Lee (Jan 2017 - Dec 2020)
  • District 5 - Brenda Moon (Jan 2017 - Dec 2020)

School Superintendent - Dr. Allen McCannon (since May 2011)

Public Schools
  • Colbert Elementary School
  • Comer Elementary School
  • Danielsville Elementary School
  • Hull-Sanford Elementary School
  • Ila Elementary School
  • Madison County Middle School (MCMS), Home of the Mustangs
  • Madison County High School (MCHS), Home of the Red Raiders
  • Broad River College and Career Academy

Private schools

  • Union Christian Academy (private), Hull
  • The Busy Box Pre-School (private), Hull
  • The Learning Train Pre-School (private), Colbert
  • Building Blocks Pre-School (private), Hull

CommunitiesEdit

Incorporated Cities

Unincorporated Communities

Notable peopleEdit

Historic SitesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. https://www.webcitation.org/60AWzlGFW?url=http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/13/13195.html. Retrieved February 16, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 196. https://books.google.com/books?id=9V1IAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA196. 
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_MANUSCRIPTS/georgia/madisonGA1921/madisonGA1921.pdf Soil Survey of Madison County, Georgia by David D. Long, 1921
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ Alschuler, Albert W. (February 1995). "Racial Quotas and the Jury". Duke Law Journal 44 (4): 704–743. DOI:10.2307/1372922. 
  8. ^ Thompson, Jim (July 11, 2004). "Highway 172 revisited". Athens Banner-Herald. http://onlineathens.com/stories/071104/new_20040711120.shtml. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. http://www.gaswcc.org/maps/. Retrieved 2015-11-18. 
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/tables.2016.html. Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. Retrieved June 24, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. Retrieved June 24, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ga190090.txt. Retrieved June 24, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. Retrieved June 24, 2014. 
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder2.census.gov. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  17. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US13195. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  18. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US13195. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  19. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US13195. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  20. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US13195. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  21. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 34°08′N 83°13′W / 34.13, -83.21


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Madison County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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