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Putnam County, New York

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Putnam County, New York
Putnam County ny seal
Seal
Map of New York highlighting Putnam County
Location in the state of New York
Map of USA NY
New York's location in the U.S.
Founded 1812
Seat Carmel
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

246 sq mi (637 km²)
231 sq mi (598 km²)
15 sq mi (39 km²), 1.21%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

95,745
414/sq mi (160/km²)
Website www.putnamcountyny.com

Putnam County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York . It is in the lower Hudson Valley. As of 2004, the population is 100,570. It is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. The county seat is Carmel. The name is in honor of Israel Putnam, who was a hero in the French and Indian War and a general in the American Revolutionary War. Putnam County is one of the most affluent counties in America, as ranked 10th among the highest-income counties in the United States by median household income.

HistoryEdit

When New York State established its first twelve counties in 1683, the present Putnam County was part of Dutchess County. Dutchess County also included two towns in the present Columbia County. Until 1713, Dutchess County was administered by Ulster County.

In 1812, Putnam County was detached from Dutchess. The six towns comprising the county had reached their current names and boundaries by 1877.

GovernmentEdit

Governmental operations in Putnam County are outlined in the County Charter which was approved by the voters of the County in November 1977. It is administered by a County Executive and a 9-member County Legislature.

The current County Executive is Robert J. Bondi. He took the oath of office on January 1, 1991. The members of the County Legislature are: Daniel G. Birmingham, Chairman, District 7, Vincent Tamagna, District 1, Sam Oliverio, Jr., District 2, Terry Intrari, District 3, Mary Conklin, District 4, Mary Ellen Odell, District 5, Tony Hay, District 6, Robert McGuigan, Jr., District 8 and Regina Morini, District 9.

The County has had three County Executives:

David D. Bruen 1979-1986

Peter C. Alexanderson, 1987-1990

Robert J. Bondi, 1991-present.

Prior to the Charter form of government, the County's affairs were managed by a six-member Board of Supervisors (one Supervisor from each town in the County).

GeographyEdit

Putnam County is located in the southeastern part of New York State, between the Hudson River on its west and the New York-Connecticut border on its east, southeast of Newburgh, north of White Plains.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 638 km² (246 sq mi). 599 km² (231 sq mi) of it is land and 39 km² (15 sq mi) of it (6.08%) is water.

The terrain of the county is generally hilly. The region of the county nearest the Hudson River is especially so and is part of the Hudson Highlands.

The highest point is in that range, on Scofield Ridge, at approximately 469 m (1,540 feet) above sea level. The lowest point is sea level along the Hudson.

Adjacent counties Edit

DemographicsEdit

As of the census² of 2000, there were 95,745 people, 32,703 households, and 25,181 families residing in the county. The population density was 160/km² (414/sq mi). There were 35,030 housing units at an average density of 58/km² (152/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 93.87% White, 1.63% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 1.24% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.67% from other races, and 1.42% from two or more races. 6.24% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

As of 2005 the population was estimated to be 86% non-Hispanic whites. African-Americans were now 2.6% of the population. 0.2% of the population was Native Americans. 1.9% was Asian. 9.2% of the population was Latino, representing a significant change in the ethnic make up of the county's population.[1]

In 2000 there were 32,703 households out of which 38.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.40% were married couples living together, 8.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.00% were non-families. 18.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.27.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.50% under the age of 18, 6.30% from 18 to 24, 32.10% from 25 to 44, 25.60% from 45 to 64, and 9.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 99.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $72,279, and the median income for a family was $82,197, the highest in the state. Males had a median income of $53,295 versus $38,390 for females. The per capita income for the county was $30,127. About 2.70% of families and 4.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.50% of those under age 18 and 7.00% of those age 65 or over.

TransportationEdit

RoadsEdit

Putnam has two interstate highways. The east-west Interstate 84 comes in from the north near Ludingtonville, and connects to the southbound Interstate 684 in Southeast toward the Connecticut border. The Taconic State Parkway, another high-speed through road, runs north-south through central Putnam.

US 9 runs north-south in the western part of the county, paralleled by NY 9D along the Hudson River. NY 22 runs north-south in the eastern part of the county.

NY 301 runs east-west from Cold Spring to Carmel. The short NY 403 connects 9 and 9D near Garrison.

Three of the region's major east-west routes traverse the eastern half of the county. NY 52 enters alongside I-84 from Dutchess County, to end at US 6 south of Carmel. East of Brewster, 6 joins US 202 and the routes leave the county and state concurrently aside the interstate.

The county's highway and facilities department maintains a number of county roads and performs snow and ice control on portions of the following numbered highways within the county:

RailEdit

The Harlem Line and the Hudson Line of the Metro North railroad provide frequent commuter rail service to New York City in the east and west. A connection to Amtrak can be made to the south at Croton-Harmon on the Hudson Line in upper Westchester County.

Towns, villages, and hamlets Edit

  • Carmel
    • Carmel -- The hamlet of Carmel is in the northeast corner of the town.
    • Carmel Hills --
    • Field Corners --
    • Hopkins Corners --
    • Mahopac -- A hamlet where the town government is located.
    • Mahopac Falls -- A hamlet in the southwest corner of the town.
    • Mahopac Point --
    • Secor Corners --
    • Tilly Foster -- A hamlet east of Carmel village.
    • West Mahopac -- A hamlet near the west town line.
  • Kent
    • Lake Carmel -- A hamlet.
    • Kent Corners --
    • Kent Hills --
    • Luddingtonville --
  • Patterson
    • Barnum Corners --
    • Camp Brady --
    • Fields Corners --
    • Haines Corners --
    • Haviland Hollow -- A hamlet along County Route 68 between NY 22 and Connecticut
    • Patterson -- The hamlet of Patterson.
    • Putnam Lake -- A lake in the eastern part of the town.
    • Putnam Lake -- A hamlet west of Putnam Lake.
    • Steinbeck Corners --
    • Towners -- A hamlet along NY 164 between NY 22 and NY 311
    • West Patterson --
  • Philipstown
    • Cold Spring -- The Village of Cold Spring
    • Forsonville --
    • Garrison --
    • Garrison Four Corners --
    • Glenclyffe --
    • Manitou --
    • McKeel Corners --
    • Nelsonville -- The Village of Nelsonville.
    • North Highland --
    • Storm King --
  • Putnam Valley
    • Adams Corners --
    • Christian Corners --
    • Gilbert Corners --
    • Lake Peekskill --
    • Oscawana Corners --
    • Putnam Valley -- The hamlet of Putnam Valley is near the south town line.
    • Tompkins Corners --
    • Sunnybrook --
  • Southeast
    • Brewster -- Village of Brewster is centrally located in the town.
    • Brewster Heights -- A hamlet west of Brewster village.
    • Deans Corners --
    • Deforest Corners --
    • Drewville Heights --
    • Dykemans --
    • Milltown --
    • Sears Corners --
    • Sodom --



North: Dutchess County
West: Hudson River
Orange County
Putnam County East: Fairfield County
Southwest: Rockland County South: Westchester County

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 41°26′N 73°45′W / 41.43, -73.75


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Putnam County, New York. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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