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Richard Stockton (c1635-1707)

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Richard "The Emigrant" Stockton (c1635-1707)

  • Born about 1635, probably in England
  • Settled on Long Island, New Netherland, now Long Island, New York
  • Petition in Flushing for William Wickenden on 8 Nov 1656.
  • Signed: The Flushing Remonstrance on 27 Dec 1657
  • Married Abigail ___?___ in about 1665, probably in Flushing, New York
  • Occupation: 1665 - Lieutenant of Horse, Landowner
  • Residence: 1675 Flushing, Long Island, New York, Rate List
  • Residence: 1683 Flushing, Long Island, New York, Rate List
  • Residence: 1685, freeholder, Flushing, Long Island, New York
  • Purchased: 30 Jan 1690 (old style) about 2,000 acres in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey (The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911, p.2)
  • Proposal: Dec of 1690 to sell Flushing, Long Island, New York, property
  • Purchased: 10 Mar 1692-93, 1,640 acres Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey - - - - - (Patents and Deeds and Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703, p. 449, 1,640 acres)
  • Sold: 12 Mar 1694, Flushing, Long Island, New York property
  • Deed: 1697 Sep. 13. Richard Stockton of Springfield, Burlington County, to Benjamin Jones, 200 acres
  • Deed: 1701 May 22, Richard Stockton to son John Stockton, 400 acres in Burlington County, New Jersey.
  • Will: 25 Jan 1704/1705 Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
  • Death: 1707 in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
  • Probate: 10 Oct 1707 Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
  • July 4, 1776 - Richard Stockton (1730-1781), a great-grandson of Richard Stockton (c.1635-1707), signed the Declaration of Independence.


Richard Stockton (c.1635-1707) of New Jersey, by Jerry Stockton
Richard "The Emigrant" Stockton (c.1635-1707) appears to have been born in England, however, there is no evidence of where in England he might have been born. There were a large number of Stockton families living all over England in the early 1600's. Although Richard might have been born near Malpas in County Cheshire, he might have been born near London in County Middlesex, or Whitchurch in County Shropshire, or Battersea in County Surrey, or Stockton-on-Tees in County Durham, or Cookham in County Berkshire, or Kimcote in County Leicestershire, or in several other places in England the Stockton family is known to have been living in the early 1600's. While it appears Richard was born in England, there does not appear to be any evidence of where in England he was born. Any place of birth shown for Richard other than England seems to be little more than a guess.

Some sources claim that a Richard Stockton was a witness to a deed in 1639 in Charlestown, Massachusetts, but that deed has not been located. Others claim that a Richard Stockton was a witness to a deed in 1649 by Ralph and Mary Hall of Charlestown, Massachusetts, but again, that deed has not been located. Richard "The Emigrant" Stockton is sometimes shown as going to the Massachusetts Bay Colony before he settled in what is now Flushing, Long Island, New York, but again, this is without any documentation. Researchers have been looking for these records for over 100 years and no one has been able to find them.

1656 It appears that on 8 Nov 1656 Richard Stockton signed a petition in Vlissingen, Long Island, New Netherland (now Flushing, Long Island, New York), in support of William Wickenden.


Early Baptists of New York, by Thomas Armitage, 1890, pp. 748-749
" 'The cobbler,' a mere term of contempt, who 'dipped' his converts at Flushing 'last year,' that is, in 1656, was Rev. William Wickenden, of Providence. He was one of the first settlers of that city, resided there in 1636, sighted the first compact in 1637, was a member of the Legislature in 1648, and from 1651 to 1655, again 1664, and died in 1669. In 1656 he visited Flushing, preached, immersed his converts in the river, and administered the Lord's Supper. Both Broadhead and O'Callagan give a full account of his treatment in consequence. Under date of November 8th, 1656, O'Callagan says: 'The Baptists at Flushing were the next to feel the wrath of the law. William Hallett, sheriff of that place, "had dared to collect conventicles in his house, and to permit one William Wickendam [properly Wickenden] to explain and comment on God's Holy Word, and to administer sacraments, though not called thereto by any civil or clerical authority." He had, moreover, assisted at such meeting and afterward "accepted from the said Wickendam's hands the bread in the form and manner the Lord's Supper is usually celebrated." For this violation of the statute Hallett was removed from office and fined fifty pounds, failing to pay which he was to be banished. On the 8th of November, 1656, the General Assembly of New Netherland 'ordained' that Wickenden should be condemned to pay a fine of one hundred pounds Flemish and be banished out of the province of New Netherland, 'the aforesaid Wickendam to remain a prisoner till the fine and cost of the process shall be paid.

The Council being informed, however, by reliable parties, that he was a very poor man, 'with a wife and many children, by profession a cobbler, which trade he neglects, so that it will be impossible to collect anything frown him,' the fine and costs were remitted, and he was condemned on the 11th of November 'to immediate banishment, under condition that if ever he be seen again in the province of New Netherland he shall be arrested and kept in confinement till the fine and costs are paid in full."


Remonstrance of the Inhabitants of the Town of Flushing to Governor Stuyvesant
December 27, 1657

Right Honorable

You have been pleased to send unto us a certain prohibition or command that we should not receive or entertain any of those people called Quakers because they are supposed to be, by some, seducers of the people. For our part we cannot condemn them in this case, neither can we stretch out our hands against them, for out of Christ God is a consuming fire, and it is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.

Wee desire therefore in this case not to judge least we be judged, neither to condemn least we be condemned, but rather let every man stand or fall to his own Master. Wee are bounde by the law to do good unto all men, especially to those of the household of faith. And though for the present we seem to be unsensible for the law and the Law giver, yet when death and the Law assault us, if wee have our advocate to seeke, who shall plead for us in this case of conscience betwixt God and our own souls; the powers of this world can neither attach us, neither excuse us, for if God justifye who can condemn and if God condemn there is none can justifye.

And for those jealousies and suspicions which some have of them, that they are destructive unto Magistracy and Ministerye, that cannot bee, for the Magistrate hath his sword in his hand and the Minister hath the sword in his hand, as witnesse those two great examples, which all Magistrates and Ministers are to follow, Moses and Christ, whom God raised up maintained and defended against all enemies both of flesh and spirit; and therefore that of God will stand, and that which is of man will come to nothing. And as the Lord hath taught Moses or the civil power to give an outward liberty in the state, by the law written in his heart designed for the good of all, and can truly judge who is good, who is evil, who is true and who is false, and can pass definitive sentence of life or death against that man which arises up against the fundamental law of the States General; soe he hath made his ministers a savor of life unto life and a savor of death unto death.

The law of love, peace and liberty in the states extending to Jews, Turks and Egyptians, as they are considered sons of Adam, which is the glory of the outward state of Holland, soe love, peace and liberty, extending to all in Christ Jesus, condemns hatred, war and bondage. And because our Saviour sayeth it is impossible but that offences will come, but woe unto him by whom they cometh, our desire is not to offend one of his little ones, in whatsoever form, name or title hee appears in, whether Presbyterian, Independent, Baptist or Quaker, but shall be glad to see any thing of God in any of them, desiring to doe unto all men as we desire all men should doe unto us, which is the true law both of Church and State; for our Saviour sayeth this is the law and the prophets.

Therefore if any of these said persons come in love unto us, we cannot in conscience lay violent hands upon them, but give them free egresse and regresse unto our Town, and houses, as God shall persuade our consciences, for we are bounde by the law of God and man to doe good unto all men and evil to noe man. And this is according to the patent and charter of our Towne, given unto us in the name of the States General, which we are not willing to infringe, and violate, but shall houlde to our patent and shall remaine, your humble subjects, the inhabitants of Vlishing. Written this 27th of December in the year 1657, by mee. Edward Hart, Clericus

Tobias Feake, Nathaniell Tue, The marke of William Noble, Nicholas Blackford, William Thorne, Seignior, The marke of Micah Tue, The marke of William Thorne, Jr., The marke of Philip Ud, Edward Tarne, Robert Field, senior, John Store, Robert Field, junior, Nathaniel Hefferd, Nich Colas Parsell, Benjamin Hubbard, Michael Milner, The marke of William Pidgion, Henry Townsend, The marke of George Clere, George Wright, Elias Doughtie, John Foard, Antonie Field, Henry Semtell, Richard Stockton, Edward Hart, Edward Griffine, John Mastine, John Townesend, Edward Farrington

[Note: Richard Stockton (c.1635-1707) was one of the 30 brave souls who on December 27, 1657, signed the Flushing Remonstrance. The inhabitants of the town of Vlissingen / Vlissing (now Flushing, Long Island, New York) were mostly English, but they were living in Dutch controlled New Netherland. The Flushing Remonstrance was protesting Governor Stuyvesant's policy that they "should not receive or entertain any of those people called Quakers." Governor Stuyvesant was the Dutch Governor of New Netherland and a member of the Dutch Reformed Church. He was known for his intolerance of religions other than his own. The Flushing Remonstrance was an important part in the establishment of freedom of religion in America. This note was added by Jerry Stockton]


1664 - Dutch Governor Petrus Stuyvesant surrendered what was then New Netherland to Richard Nicolls of England. New Netherland became the English Colony of New York, and the town of Vlissingen, Long Island, New Netherland, became Flushing, Long Island, New York. Richard Nicolls became the first English colonial governor of New York.


The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911, p. 1
"Richard Stockton was commissioned Lieutenant of Horse of Flushing Apr. 22d, 1665."

"Governor Francis Lovelace . . . Colony of New York, Apr. 9, 1669 . . . Whereas I intimated lately that I did approve of Richard Stockton to be Lieutenant of the Company of Foot, but I am since informed he was before enlisted and engaged in the Horse service, and I have thought fit to acquit him either as Officer or otherwise from the Foot service."


1675 and 1683 Tax Rates, Flushing, Long Island, New York.


The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911, p. 2
"In 1675 his estate at Flushing consisted of twelve acres of land, one negro slave, five horses, five cows, and five swine ; and in 1683 of ten acres of upland, the same slave, two horses, four oxen, seven cows, four swine and twenty sheep. This did not, however, represent th full amount of his landed estate, as will be seen from the following proposal entered in an account book kept by John Browne, of Flushing, who acted as his agent in the matter :

10 mo. [Dec.], 1690. Richard Stockton's proposal for [the sale of] all his housing, lands and conveniences belonging thereunto, being about seventy acres or more at home and two ten-acre lotts and two twenty-acre lotts at a mile or two distance, with so much medow as may yield 20 or 25 loads of hay a year ; price £300."


The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911, pp. 2-3
"In 1685 Richard Stockton was one of the freeholders of Flushing, as appears by a deed made in that year confirming the old Dutch patent of 1645. He must have been in easy circumstances at that time, because on the 30th day of January, 1690 (old style), he purchased of George Hutchinson his house and plantation, called Oneanickon, or Annanicken, as it was first called, in West Jersey, consisting of about two thousand acres, although he did not succeed in disposing of his property at Flushing until March 12, 1694 . . . It is stated by Mr. J. W. Stockton, in his History of the Stockton Family, that the tract of land purchased by Richard Stockton in West Jersey was originally known by the Indian name of An-na-nicken ; that it was over two miles in length and one in width ; and that the mansion house of the late James Shreve is on the site of the house built and occupied by Mr. Stockton until his death."


The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911, p. 2
"10 mo. [Dec.], 1690. Richard Stockton's proposal for [the sale of] all his housing, lands and conveniences belonging thereunto, being about seventy acres or more at home and two ten-acre lotts and two twenty-acre lotts at a mile or two distance, with so much medow as may yield 20 or 25 loads of hay a year ; price £300."


Patents and Deeds and Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703, edited by William Nelson, 1899
West Jersey Records, Liber B, Part 2.

p. 449 "1692-3 10th d. 1st m. (March). Do. George Hutcheson of Burlington, distiller, to Richard Stockton, late of Flushing, Long Island, yeoman, for 1,640 acres Onianickon, Burlington Co., between Hananiah Gaunt, Thomas Scholey, John Warren, the Indian pruchase, John Tomlinson and Isaac Leet alias John Chadwick, excepting 200 a. sold to Robert Hutcheson and 60 sold to John Warren. [page] 388"


Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1899
Revel's Book of Surveys.

p. 369 no date "The Bounds of George Hutcheson's Land Comprehending Robert Hutchesons 200 Acres & John Warrens 60 Excluding John Warrens Settlemt of 200 Arcres: Plantation at Oneanickon, 1640 acres, between Hananiah Gaunt, Thomas Scholey, the Indian purchase, John Warren and John Tomlinson. "This Tract sold to Richard Stockton as in Book B page 388."


The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911, p. 2
"March 12, 1694 . . . In consideration of three hundred pounds, good and lawful money of the Province of New York, Richard Stockton, formerly of fflushing, with the consent of his wife, Abigail, conveyed to John Rodman, his messuages or tenements, situate, lying and being by coast on the bay, commonly called Mattagareson Bay, within the bounds of fflushing, being about eighty acres of land more or less ; with all ye Privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging, as also a piece of Salt medow commonly called ye Lumkill, which was belonging to Richard Stockton by virtue of his interest in the s'd towne of fflushing."


History of the Stockton Family, by John Wharton Stockton, 1881
". . . that the tract of land purchased by Richard Stockton in West Jersey was originally known by the Indian name of An-na-nicken; that it was over two miles in length and one in width; and that the mansion house of the late James Shreve is on the site of the house built and occupied by Mr. Stockton until his death."


Patents and Deeds and Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703, edited by William Nelson, 1899
New Jersey Colonial Documents.

p. 506 "1697 Sep. 13. Do. Richard Stockton of Springfield, Burlington Co., to Benjamin Jones of the same place, for 200 acres there, between Michael Newbold, John Butcher and Henry Beck, incl. in these lines 16 a. of John Warren and John Sikes. [page] 620"

p. 514 "1699 May 10. Do. Benjamin Jones of Burlington Co., yeoman, and wife Sarah, to Willam Black junior of Chesterfield, same Co., yeoman, for 200 acres at Oneanickon, said Co., given to grantors by the wife's father, Richard Stockton, Sept. 30, 1697. [page] 646"

p. 532 "1701 May 22. Deed. Richard Stockton of Burlington Co., yeoman, to his son John Stockton, for 400 acres in said Co., bought of George Hutcheson, E. Tho: Willson, N. John Sykes. [page] 704"


The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911, pp. 3-4

In the name of God, Amen:

I, Richard Stockton, being sick and weak of body but sound of memory, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and forme following:

First , I bequeath my soule into the hands of Almighty God and my body to be buried at the discretion of my executors hereafter named, in hopes through the merrits of Jesus Christ to obtain a joyfull resurrection.

Item, I give to my son Richard after the decease of my wife four hundred ackers of land to him and to his heirs and assignes forever.

Item, I give to my son Job my plantation and all the improvements with four hundred ackers of land to him and to his heires and assignes forever, not to possess it till the decease of my wife; only in consideration of the said improvements my said son Job shall pay to Abigail the daughter of my son [son-in-law] Richard Ridgway the sum of ten pounds within a year after he enjoys the said plantation, and if uppon a resurvey of the whole twelve hundred ackers there happen to be any overplus, my will is that my son John shall have one-third part thereof joyning on his four hundred ackers which I formerly gave him, and the other two-thirds to be equally parted between my said sons Richard and Job.

Item, I give to my dear wife Abigail all my personall estate with the use of my plantation during her life, and after her decease the said personall estate to be equally divided between my five daughters, Abigail, Mary, Sarah, Hannah and Elizabeth; and I do make and Constitute my said wife Abigail my sole Executrix of this my last will and testament, revokeing all other wills and testaments heretofore made, as witness my hand and seale this 25th day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand and seven hundred and five.

[ SEAL ] RICHARD (his R mark) STOCKTON.

Signed, sealed, published and declared in the presence of us. WILLIAM EARLE (WE) his mark, THOMAS RIDGEWAY (T) his mark, DANIEL LEEDS.

Burlington, 10th, 8 mo., 1707.

Then appeared before Richard Inglesby, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor of her Majesties Provinces of New Jersey, New York, &c., Daniel Leeds, Esqr., one of the witnesses to the within written will, and made oath on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God that he saw the Testator sign, seal, and publish the within instrument to be his last will and testament, and that at the time of the publishing thereof he was of sound and perfect understanding and memory to the best of this deponent's knowledge and beliefe, and that at the same time he saw Thomas Ridgeway and Wm. Earle sign the same as witness thereto in the presence of the Testator.

RICHARD INGLESBY.


CHILDREN:

Richard Stockton (c.1635-1707) of New Jersey, by Jerry Stockton

Richard "The Emigrant" Stockton (c.1635-1707) and his wife Abigail (nee ___?___ ) Stockton

  • Richard "The Builder" Stockton, born c.1665 in Flushing, Long Island, New York, m. Susannah Witham
  • Abigail Stockton, born c.1667 in Flushing, Long Island, New York, m. Richard Ridgway
  • Mary Stockton, born c.1669, Flushing, New York, m. 1. Thomas Shinn, 2. Silas Crispin, 3. Richard Ridgway
  • Sarah Stockton, born c.1671 in Flushing, Long Island, New York, m. 1. Benjamin Jones, 2. William Venicomb
  • John Stockton, born 10 Aug 1674 in Flushing, Long Island, New York, m. Mary Leeds
  • Job Stockton, born c.1676 in Flushing, Long Island, New York, m. Anna Petty
  • Hannah Stockton, born c.1678 in Flushing, Long Island, New York, m. Philip Phillips
  • Elizabeth Stockton, born c.1682 in Flushing, Long Island, New York, m. William Budd


LINKS:
Richard "The Emigrant" Stockton (c1635-1707) - Find A Grave
Abigail (nee unknown) Stockton - Find A Grave

The Flushing Remonstrance - Wikipedia
New Netherland - Wikipedia
Petrus Stuyvesant - Wikipedia
Richard Nicolls - Wikipedia
William Wickenden - Wikipedia
Dutch West India Company - Wikipedia
Massachusetts Bay Colony - Wikipedia
Richard Stockton (1730-1781) - Wikipedia
Declaration of Independence - Wikipedia

DNA proves that Richard Stockton (c.1635-1707) is NOT related to:
Davis Stockton (c.1685-1761) of Albemarle County, Virginia.


SOURCES:

  • History of the Stockton Family, by John Wharton Stockton, 1881
  • The Stockton Family of England and the United States, by William Francis Cregar, 1888
  • Early Baptists of New York, By Thomas Armitage, 1890
  • Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume XXI,1664-1703, edited by William Nelson, 1899
  • Patents and Deeds and Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703, edited by William Nelson (Originally publshed as Archives of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Volume XXI, 1899.)
  • The Stockton Genealogy, by Rev. Elias Boudinot Stockton, 1909
  • The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M.D., 1911
  • A House Called Morven, by Alfred Hoyt Bill, 1954
  • Richard Stockton (c.1635-1707) of New Jersey, by Jerry Stockton
  • New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty, by Evan Haefeli, 2012



Sources and notes

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