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Towns County, Georgia
Towns County Georgia Courthouse
Towns County courthouse in Hiawassee
Map of Georgia highlighting Towns County
Location in the state of Georgia (U.S. state)
Map of USA GA
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1856
Named for George W. Towns
Seat Hiawassee
Largest city Young Harris
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

172 sq mi (445 km²)
167 sq mi (433 km²)
5.4 sq mi (14 km²), 3.2%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

10,471
63/sq mi (24/km²)
Congressional district 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.townscountyga.com/

Towns County is a county located on the northern border of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,471.[1] Its county seat is Hiawassee.[2] The county was created on March 6, 1856 and named for United States lawyer, legislator, and politician George W. Towns.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 172 square miles (450 km2), of which 167 square miles (430 km2) is land and 5.4 square miles (14 km2) (3.2%) is water.[3] Towns is mostly in the Hiwassee River sub-basin of the Middle Tennessee-Hiwassee basin, with a part of the county in the Tugaloo River sub-basin in the larger Savannah River basin, as well as a small portion of the county's southwestern corner in the Chattahoochee River sub-basin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin),[4] near the source of the Chattahoochee in neighboring Union County.

Towns County is located amidst the Blue Ridge Mountains, (part of the Appalachian Mountains), some of which are protected by the Chattahoochee National Forest. Brasstown Bald, the highest mountain in Georgia, rises in southwest Towns County, straddling the Union County line. The source of the Hiwassee River is located in eastern Towns County, from which it flows northward into North Carolina. Chatuge Lake, an artificial reservoir created by the completion of Chatuge Dam by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the 1940s, dominates the northeastern section of Towns County and extends into North Carolina. State Route 515 from north of Atlanta ends here at the North Carolina state line near Young Harris.

The county was traversed by a road built upon a traditional Cherokee trading path, which ran north to south through the county, passing through Unicoi Gap. It served as a line between European-American settlers and the Cherokee until after the Indian cessions and Indian Removal in the 1830s, when it fell solely into the hands of the whites. When the Cherokee were expelled by US forces from their villages, they were forced temporarily into "removal forts." One had been constructed in what is now Hiawassee, the county seat. They were forced to travel what is known as the Trail of Tears to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River, a journey during which many Cherokee died.

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areaEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1860 2,459
1870 2,780 13.1%
1880 3,261 17.3%
1890 4,064 24.6%
1900 4,748 16.8%
1910 3,932 −17.2%
1920 3,937 0.1%
1930 4,346 10.4%
1940 4,925 13.3%
1950 4,803 −2.5%
1960 4,538 −5.5%
1970 4,565 0.6%
1980 5,638 23.5%
1990 6,754 19.8%
2000 9,319 38.0%
2010 10,471 12.4%
Est. 2016 11,391 [5] 22.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2013[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 9,319 people, 3,998 households, and 2,826 families residing in the county. The population density was 56 people per square mile (22/km²). There were 6,282 housing units at an average density of 38 per square mile (15/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.80% White, 0.13% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.18% from other races, and 0.41% from two or more races. 0.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,998 households out of which 20.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.90% were married couples living together, 6.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.30% were non-families. 26.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.61.

In the county, the population was spread out with 16.30% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 20.50% from 25 to 44, 28.30% from 45 to 64, and 25.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49 years. For every 100 females there were 89.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,950, and the median income for a family was $37,295. Males had a median income of $28,657 versus $21,813 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,221. About 8.80% of families and 11.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.60% of those under age 18 and 10.40% of those age 65 or over. Towns County is inside the Bible Belt.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,471 people, 4,510 households, and 2,981 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 62.9 inhabitants per square mile (24.3 /km2). There were 7,731 housing units at an average density of 46.4 per square mile (17.9 /km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 97.7% white, 0.4% black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.6% from other races, and 0.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.0% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 16.3% were Irish, 15.4% were German, 13.8% were English, 11.7% were American, and 8.3% were Scotch-Irish.[13]

Of the 4,510 households, 20.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.9% were non-families, and 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 2.65. The median age was 51.1 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,540 and the median income for a family was $48,020. Males had a median income of $31,668 versus $27,127 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,527. About 5.6% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.2% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.[14]

GovernmentEdit

Towns County's Sole Commissioner is Bill Kendall, who has served since 2005.[15]

Towns County's Sheriff, Chris Clinton, was elected in a special election in 2007. Sheriff Clinton was re-elected in the general election in 2008, where he ran unopposed after serving only four months in office.

Towns County's Judge of Magistrate and Probate Court is D. David Rogers, who was elected in 2008, beating 30 year Democrat incumbent, Wayne Garrett. David and his wife, Alicia, live in Young Harris, GA. He is the son of well-known minister, Rev. James "Jimmy" Rogers of Hayesville, NC and Helen Adams Rogers of Andrews, NC. The Towns County Probate and Magistrate Courts are combined with a single judge presiding over both Courts. This combination court is one of very few in the State of Georgia (Long County is another example).

Previous Presidential Elections Results[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 79.6% 5,383 17.9% 1,210 2.5% 171
2012 78.1% 4,876 20.4% 1,273 1.5% 95
2008 74.5% 4,292 24.1% 1,391 1.4% 81
2004 72.3% 3,823 27.1% 1,430 0.6% 32
2000 64.5% 2,902 33.2% 1,495 2.2% 100
1996 48.6% 2,030 39.8% 1,664 11.6% 485
1992 45.2% 1,674 40.2% 1,487 14.7% 543
1988 65.1% 1,783 34.4% 942 0.5% 13
1984 66.1% 1,960 33.9% 1,007
1980 48.1% 1,475 49.3% 1,510 2.6% 80
1976 39.7% 1,175 60.3% 1,786
1972 79.6% 1,573 20.4% 404
1968 52.3% 1,492 27.0% 770 20.7% 589
1964 46.9% 1,140 53.0% 1,289 0.1% 3
1960 54.7% 1,272 45.3% 1,052
1956 55.3% 1,096 44.7% 885
1952 46.9% 983 53.1% 1,111
1948 0.7% 6 62.6% 516 36.7% 302
1944 37.2% 674 62.8% 1,137
1940 48.1% 830 51.9% 894
1936 49.0% 732 51.0% 763
1932 51.6% 790 48.4% 742
1928 62.4% 857 37.6% 517
1924 55.8% 765 44.0% 604 0.2% 3
1920 60.9% 398 39.1% 256
1916 56.9% 481 42.4% 358 0.7% 6
1912 39.2% 206 43.8% 230 17.0% 89

Cities and communitiesEdit

Incorporated citiesEdit

Census-designated placeEdit

  • Tate City (only accessible from Rabun County)

Other unincorporated communitiesEdit

Notable nativesEdit

  • Zell Miller — former Georgia governor and U.S. senator.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Commons-logo
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/13/13281.html. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. http://www.gaswcc.org/maps/. Retrieved 2015-11-17. 
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/tables.2016.html. Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ga190090.txt. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder2.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US13281. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US13281. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US13281. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  14. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US13281. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  15. ^ The man in the driver’s seat of Towns County, Hiawassee River Watershed Coalition
  16. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 34°55′N 83°44′W / 34.92, -83.74


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Towns County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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