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Upshur County, West Virginia

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Upshur County, West Virginia
Upshur County Courthouse Buckhannon
The Upshur County Courthouse, designed by architect Harrison Albright, pictured in Buckhannon in 2006
Map of West Virginia highlighting Upshur County
Location in the state of West Virginia
Map of USA WV
West Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded March 26, 1851
Named for Abel Parker Upshur
Seat Buckhannon
Largest city Buckhannon
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

355 sq mi (919 km²)
355 sq mi (919 km²)
0.1 sq mi (0 km²), 0.03%
PopulationEst.
 - (2015)
 - Density

24,758
70/sq mi (27/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.upshurcounty.org/

Upshur County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 24,254.[1] Its county seat is Buckhannon.[2] The county was formed in 1851 from Randolph, Barbour, and Lewis counties and named for Abel Parker Upshur, a distinguished statesman and jurist of Virginia.[3] Upshur served as United States Secretary of State and Secretary of the Navy under President John Tyler.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 355 square miles (920 km2), of which 355 square miles (920 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.03%) is water.[4] The county falls within the United States National Radio Quiet Zone.

The highest place in elevation in Upshur County is 3160 feet, near Sugar Run on the Randolph and Upshur County lines just outside Palace Valley and Hemlock. It is reported there is an elevation marker at the site.

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1860 7,292
1870 8,023 10.0%
1880 10,249 27.7%
1890 12,714 24.1%
1900 14,696 15.6%
1910 16,629 13.2%
1920 17,851 7.3%
1930 17,944 0.5%
1940 18,360 2.3%
1950 19,242 4.8%
1960 18,292 −4.9%
1970 19,092 4.4%
1980 23,427 22.7%
1990 22,867 −2.4%
2000 23,404 2.3%
2010 24,254 3.6%
Est. 2015 24,758 [5] 5.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2015[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 24,254 people, 9,619 households, and 6,528 families residing in the county. The population density was 68.4 people per square mile (25/km²). There were 11,099 housing units at an average density of 31.3 per square mile (12/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.6% White, 0.7% Black or African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1% from two or more races. 1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,619 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.1% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.4 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.7% from age 0 to 19, 7.60% from 20 to 24, 22.6% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 97 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,381, whereas the median income for families was 44,937 . Males had a median income of $36,517 versus $25,420 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,498. About 14.1% of families and 19.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 14.1% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 24,254 people, 9,619 households, and 6,528 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 68.4 inhabitants per square mile (26.4 /km2). There were 11,099 housing units at an average density of 31.3 per square mile (12.1 /km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 97.6% white, 0.7% black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.0% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 18.1% were German, 13.8% were American, 10.6% were Irish, and 8.6% were English.[13]

Of the 9,619 households, 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.0% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.1% were non-families, and 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.88. The median age was 40.9 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $36,114 and the median income for a family was $44,937. Males had a median income of $36,517 versus $25,420 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,823. About 14.1% of families and 19.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 14.1% of those age 65 or over.[14]

PoliticsEdit

Presidential election results[15]
Year Republican Democrat
2012 71.57% 5,939 26.01% 2,158
2008 65.89% 5,911 32.61% 2,925
2004 66.62% 6,191 32.65% 3,034
2000 63.58% 5,165 34.10% 2,770

EconomyEdit

Economy includes coal mining and timber, as well as higher education - the Upshur County seat of Buckhannon is home to the small, private, liberal arts institution West Virginia Wesleyan College. The West Virginia State Wildlife Center in French Creek also generates some income as a popular tourist attraction. Upshur County also unintentionally gained some international notoriety during the Sago Mine disaster coal mine explosion on January 2, 2006, in the Sago Mine in Sago, near the Upshur County seat of Buckhannon. The blast and ensuing aftermath trapped 13 miners for nearly two days, only one of whom survived. It was the worst mining disaster in the US since a 2001 disaster in Alabama killed 13 people, and the worst disaster in West Virginia since a 1968 incident that killed 78 people.

CommunitiesEdit

CityEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Magisterial districtsEdit

Upshur County's six districts were formed on July 31, 1863:

Notable natives and residentsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/54/54097.html. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ http://www.wvculture.org/history/wvcounties.html
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_54.txt. Retrieved July 31, 2015. 
  5. ^ "County Totals Dataset: Population, Population Change and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". http://www.census.gov/popest/data/counties/totals/2015/CO-EST2015-alldata.html. Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/wv190090.txt. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder2.census.gov. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US54097. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US54097. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US54097. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  14. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US54097. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  15. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/. Retrieved 2016-04-06. 

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 38°54′N 80°14′W / 38.90, -80.23


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Upshur County, West Virginia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

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