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Walker in Washington County, Virginia

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Early Walker Families of Washington County, Virginia
Compiled By Jerry Brimberry
September 17, 2006
Blue Ridge NC

BackgroundEdit

Four distinct Walker lines have been identified among the records of Washington County, Virginia before 1800. They are, in order of probable arrival:

  1. John Walker III of the Wigton Walker line, who settled in present Scott County
  2. another John Walker who resided on the Middle Fork of the Holston River in now Smyth County before moving to Hawkins County, Tennessee
  3. William Walker who settled on Laurel Fork near Piney Mountain in present Tazewell County
  4. Isaiah Walker whose marriage record is found in Washington County and whose DNA shows he was related to Meadow Creek John Walker of Greene County, Tennessee.

Most of the Walkers identified in Washington County records during this time period are believed to be associated with the above four lines.


Two sisters, Dicey and Spicy Walker, are known from 1790 Washington County marriage records and are of interest to a number of Walker researchers. Dicey and Spicy may or may not have been connected to one the foregoing lines. Famed explorer Dr. Thomas Walker also owned and sold land in Washington County during this period, but neither he nor any of his descendants are believed to have lived in the area.


Readers should note that direct, male descendants of each of these lines have participated in the Walker Family Tree Y-DNA Project. The descendants of

  • John Walker III belong to Group 33;
  • Middle Fork John Walker (a.k.a. Hawkins County John Walker) to Group 18;
  • William Walker of Laurel Fork is unmatched; and Isaiah Walker to Group 27.

Additional information on the application of YDNA results for these families can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fabercove/test_results.htm. Citations [appearing in brackets] in this text are cross-referenced at the conclusion of this narrative. A Timeline or chronology and Bibliography of Sources are also provided at the end of this text.

John Walker III of the Wigton Walker lineEdit

The earliest known Walker to settle in Washington County was John Walker III (c1705-c1776), son of John Walker II and Katherine Rutherford of Wigton, Scotland. (White, 1902) Research conducted by others shows that John Walker III moved from Orange County, North Carolina to Washington County, Virginia c1773, settling on Sinking Creek, near the Sink, [1] in present-day Scott County. John Walker III moved to then Washington County with his extended family, consisting of two sons, John Walker IV (a.k.a. Indian Killer) and Samuel Walker (killed by Indians), and the families of his seven daughters and their husbands (Patrick Porter, Andrew Cowen, William Cowen, John Snoddy, Samuel Cowen, and Alexander Montgomery). A seventh daughter, Hetty (Catharine), married Robert Bell in North Carolina, and died prior to the move to southwest Virginia.

According to the “Genealogy of the Descendants of John Walker of Wigton, Scotland” (White, 1902), John Walker III married Ann Houston in March 1734 and moved from Pennsylvania to Rockbridge County, Virginia via Augusta County, thence to Orange County, North Carolina (present Caswell County) before returning to Virginia. His surviving son, John Walker IV is found in numerous early records of Washington County, including the 1782 tax rolls. [15]

John Walker IV married a Miss Long according to White (1902). Their son, William Walker, was captured by Indians as a boy and lived out his life among the Wyandot Indians in Ohio. Direct male descendants of captive William Walker belong to Group 33 of the Walker DNA Project. White provides little information about this family except that John Walker IV’s son was stolen by the Indians when about 11 years old and carried off and raised by them. This is corroborated by Emory Hamilton’s “Indian Tragedies against the Walker Family” and Bil Gilbert’s “Westering Man: The Life of Joseph Walker”. One account indicates Samuel was killed and his nephew William taken captive while plowing a field. Another account suggests the incident occurred while they were traveling to Moore’s fort.

According to White, William Walker was born about 1770 and he was 11 which would date the attack around 1781--- three years after John IV was designated administrator of his slain brother’s estate. Assuming that the Walker Indian tragedy occurred in 1778 and William Walker’s birth year is correct, he was about 8 years old when taken captive. Likewise, John Walker III’s will probated Nov. 17, 1778 in Washington Co., VA names his grandson, William Walker as well as his sons, John and Samuel, as executors indicating that John III’s will was drawn before Samuel was killed and William was taken captive. [30] William married Catherine Rankin, the daughter of James Rankin and Mary Montour, who belonged to the Big Turtle Clan of Wyandots. Their son, William Walker, Jr., was the first Territorial Governor of Nebraska Territory. The latter’s direct male descendants belong to Walker DNA Group 33.

John Walker III’s will was witnessed by three of his sons-in-law, Alexander Montgomery, William Cowan and Andrew Cowan. [30] An inventory and appraisement of Samuel Walker’s estate on August 17, 1779 was also recorded in Washington Co. Will Book I. [31] It appears that John Walker IV, who administered his father and brother’s estates, moved about 1786 to that part of North Carolina which later became Blount County, Tennessee, together with several known children: Samuel, John and daughter Mary (Snider). Another son, Robert, followed his father and siblings to Blount County 10-years later. (WPA, 1936) Both the aforementioned captive William Walker and his brother Robert Walker also appeared in the records of Washington County, to wit: John Walker III died in 1778, naming his grandson William in his will 31 and Robert Walker appeared on the 1787 and 1790 tax lists of Washington County. [23, 24]

On June 6, 1793 Robert Walker acquired “110 acres on the waters of the North Fork of Holstein River and on the north side of Walker’s Mountain and adjoining the property of Matthias Andis.” [51] On January 20, 1795, Robert Walker and his wife, Elizabeth, sold 105 acres “on the waters of the North Fork of Holston, on the north side of Walkers Mountain” for $67 to George Buchanan. [36] These and other records permit us to accurately fix the location of Robert’s property west, southwest of Abingdon in the lower part of the county. After selling his homestead Robert joined his father, John Walker IV, and brothers John and Samuel Walker, in Blount County, Tennessee. Robert may have also appeared near his father on the 1782 tax list but his first name was accidentally torn from the record. [16] Although Robert was the only Walker to appear on the 1790 tax rolls of Washington County, several other Walkers are known to have resided in the upper county in 1790. Siblings John and Margaret Walker who married siblings Susannah and John Pitcher in 1792 are believed to have been Robert and Elizabeth’s children, and John Walker IV’s grandchildren. [27A, 27B]

John Walker of the Middle Fork of the Holston RiverEdit

Also known as Hawkins County John Walker (HCJW), his 400-acre land grant on the Middle Fork of the Holston indicated that the actual date of settlement was in 1775. [3] In 1782, he received another land grant located on the Middle Fork of the Holston River for 195 acres including improvements. [4] His property adjoined Revolutionary War General William Campbell's patent. [41] According to Summers (1929), General Campbell was the brother-in-law of famed orator and Virginia Governor, Patrick Henry. Campbell’s estate, called Aspinvale, was located near the Seven Mile Ford of the Middle Fork of the Holston River, between Marion and Chilhowie in present-day Smyth County. However, John Walker’s tract was situated at least one mile west of the river. John Walker appeared on the Washington County tax roll in 1785 before moving to Hawkins County, Tennessee ca 1787. [18, 20] Two of his sons, Joshua and John Walker, Jr. also appeared in the early records of Washington County. [11, 21, 25]

Joshua Walker served in the Cherokee Campaign and Battle of Long Island under the command of Captain James Thompson. [21] At one point, he was also stationed at Captain James Thompson’s stone house located on Bakers Creek near the confluence of the Middle Fork of the Holston River. In 1786, Joshua Walker married Elizabeth Bunde at St. Clair’s Bottom Baptist Church. [25] Thomas Woolsey, who was the late Jerry Penley’s ancestor, performed Joshua Walker and Elizabeth Bunde’s wedding. A year later, John Walker, Jr. appeared as a non-tithable between the ages of 18-21 on the 1787 tax rolls for upper Washington County. John Walker, Jr. followed his father to TN by 1789 and was in Knox Co., KY by 1803.[18]

Family researcher, Randy Walker, who is directly descended from John Walker, wrote:

“Joshua Walker was born on 15 Feb 1757 in Loudoun County, Virginia and was living in Washington County, Virginia when Joshua joined Capt. Thomson's company of militia in 1776. (This is from Joshua Walker's pension affidavit filed in Hawkins County, Tennessee on 24 May 1834.) A Joshua Walker is named in the will of John Walker (HCJW) who died in Hawkins County in 1818 and lived in the same vicinity as HCJW and other children named in the will in southern Hawkins County in the early 1800s.”
“Joshua Walker died in Hawkins Co., TN in 1840. His widow, according to his pension file, was Amy Williams, who he married in Grayson Co., Virginia 17 September 1800. Note that Joshua was 43 years old when he married Amy Williams. This might not have been Joshua's first marriage (i.e., he could also be/probably was the Joshua Walker who married Elizabeth Bunde in Washington County, Virginia on 5 Jan 1786). Since Joshua was 19 when he joined the militia, it is possible if not probable that his father, John Walker (likely born before 1740 and died Hawkins County, Tennessee in 1818), was living in Washington County, Virginia in 1776 as well.”
“Land records show that a John Walker owned land on the Middle Fork of the Holston during this time period near the Capt. James Thompson mentioned in Joshua's pension file. For this reason, I believe that the John Walker of the Middle Fork may be Joshua Walker's father, HCJW.”
“We Hawkins County Walkers are still sorting out John's family. The fact that Joshua Walker was born in 1757 and HCJW’s youngest child was born about 1800 raises the question on whether Rev. War Joshua could have been John's brother instead of his son. However, the birthdates of John's other children named in the will support the idea that there was only one Joshua (born 1757) and that he was the son of John Walker who died in Hawkins Co., TN in 1818. John Walker’s will below names his wife, Elizabeth, and children; Joshua, John, Walter, Edward, Elizabeth, Jane (Epperson), James, Cinthia, Sarah, Francis, and Andrew.”

Will of John Walker Dated Aug. 19, 1818

In the name of God, Amen.
I John Walker of the County of Hawkins and State of Tennessee, being weak in body but of sound and perfect mind and memory, considering the uncertainty of the mortal life, blessed be Almighty God for the same, do make and publish this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following (viz)
First. After paying all just debts, I give and bequeath unto my eldest children (viz) Joshua Walker one dollar, John Walker one dollar, Walter Walker one dollar, Edward Walker one dollar, Elizabeth Walker my daughter one dollar, and Jane Epperson one dollar, and James Walker one dollar, which said several legacies I will and order to be paid to the said respective legatees; after my decease, and the rest of the estate to be equally divided between my beloved wife Elizabeth Walker and my four youngest children (viz) Cinthia Walker, Sarah Walker, Francis Walker and Andrew Walker, and also I hereby appoint Elizabeth Walker, my wife, sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former Wills by me made. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.
Signed, sealed and declared by the above named John Walker to be his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who have hereunto subscribed our names John x Walker (Seal)
as witnesses in the presence of the Testator. His (X)mark James x Walker; his mark Nicholas Long

”Summers (1929), “The Annals of Southwest Virginia”, provides proof given of service of John Walker, Sr. in Cherokee Expedition from Washington County, Virginia: ‘Per Proclamation of 1765’...John Walker private under Col. William Christian upon Cherokee Expedition in August 27, 1776…received seven pounds Sterling for 49 days Of military duty, as per Account Audited." [11] [Note: The identification of "John Walker Sr." as Hawkins County John Walker seems to be based primarily on the fact that Joshua Walker, son of HCJW also served in the Cherokee Expedition. This is is suggestive, but it would have been possible for this to be a different John Walker. For example, he could be John Walker IV of the Wigton line who is known to have had a son John, and hence could have been easily referred to as "John Sr." Bill 16:49, 5 October 2006 (UTC)]

Randy Walker is also a participant in the Walker DNA Project (Group 18).

William Walker of Laurel ForkEdit

William Walker of Laurel Fork and his wife Elizabeth arrived in Washington County possibly as early as 1773. 5 Likewise, a William Walker witnessed the will of William Cole on 8 October 1776. (Edwards, 1984) While his arrival in Washington County is not date certain, the first surveys of Washington County indicates that he settled on Laurel Fork in 1773. [5] William Walker also appears in several other early records of Washington County, including the 1782, 1785 and 1787 tax rolls. [17, 19, 22] He died intestate in the winter of 1789/1790. Volume 2, page 105 of the “Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement of Virginia” by Lyman Chalkley shows that when William died he was engaged in a lawsuit with Robert Preston, a wealthy landowner and public official.

According to Chalkley’s Chronicles, “Walker vs. Preston--O. S. 93; N. S. 31--William Walker, late of Washington County, died intestate, leaving widow, Elizabeth, and eight children, viz: Nancy (m. Wm. Gallehan), Betsey (m. Wm. Carmack), John, William, Peggy (m. Elijah Tancray), James (infant), Lucy (infant), Elsy (infant). At William's death all were infants except John. In 1773 Henry Dougherty made a settlement on Laurel Fork of Holston River. Dougherty sold to John Newland, who sold to James Crabtree, who sold to William Walker, deceased. William Crabtree deposes he knew the land as a hunter, 1772-1779. Mrs. Nancy Tate, a settler, deposes. Robert Fowler, a settler, 1779, deposes. James Crabtree, a settler, deposes, Robertson County, Tenn, 1805, that his deposition was formerly taken in Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky. Aaron Lewis, a surveyor, deposes, 1804, in Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky. Andrew Marshall deposes that John Dougherty left the county in 1778 and Henry Dougherty in 1779. James Crabtree deposes that in 1780 or 1781, Wm. Walker settled on Laurel Fork. Elisha Dungans, a settler, deposes that Wm. Walker in 1778 or 1779 moved to Middle Fork of Holston. James Tosh deposes he knew no improvement earlier than Parson Terry's. James Stokes lived on it at one time. Charles Thurman deposes he was married in June, 1790, and William Walker, died the winter before. Robert Dennison deposes that Henry and John Dougherty moved from this country in fall of 1779. Joseph Dougherty lived on Reed Creek. Deponent is brother-in-law to the Doughertys.”

Researcher Nina Strahm secured a photocopy of the lawsuit abstracted above. I recall that one witness purported that William planted corn to secure his claim, and left for a short period to retrieve his family in Botetourt County, however, I am unable to verify this at this time. Suffice, the lawsuit was decided in favor of William’s heirs several years after his death. It should also be noted that several of his children married and resided in the Keywood-Old Glade Spring-Middle Fork vicinity in close proximity to unassigned Dicey Walker and her husband, Peter Broomberry, [26A] and her younger sister, Spicy Walker, who married James Meek, [26B] in the months following William’s death. However, there is no proven connection between Dicey and Spicy Walker and the heirs of William Walker.

The disputed property of William Walker was near or beside Piney Mountain and the Laurel Fork of the North Fork of the Holston River, a short distance north of Broadford along State Route 91 in present-day Tazewell County, Virginia. Located about 8 miles northeast of Saltville, William received three separate land grants along the Laurel Fork. To reiterate, the first in 1782 for 400 acres states William settled along the Laurel Fork in 1773. 5, The second and third grants were both received in 1786 for 355 acres and 186 acres respectively along the Laurel Fork. [6, 7]

William Walker along with many others, including Peter Brymberry and Peter’s cousin, James Hendrix of Elk Garden, were among 261 persons listed in an inventory & appraisement taken on September 9, 1789 of the estate of Thomas Stuart. [33] Stuart was a wealthy Washington County merchant and tradesman who operated an emporium located in Old Glade Spring. Stuart’s nephews also traveled the countryside with goods-laden wagons. Thus it is unknown whether William Walker purchased his merchandise at Stuart’s emporium or from his tinker nephews.

As mentioned above, William Walker died during the winter of 1789/1790 at which time only one of his eight children, John, was of age. In 1795, his widow, Elizabeth Walker, married Pleasant Point veteran and widower John Crank (also Crunk). [30] According to “Annals of Southwest Virginia” (Summers, 1929; p.1295), the couple was wed by Edward Crawford, the third minister at Glade Spring Presbyterian Church, which was originally named Ebbing Spring Presbyterian Church and located near the confluence of Bakers Creek and the Middle Fork of the Holston River. A different source, “The Marriages of Washington County, Virginia, 1781-1853” (Brown, 1993) states that the wedding was performed by Andrew Baker, the second minister of St. Clair’s Bottom Baptist Church, located on the South Fork of the Holston River.

The latter location seems unlikely since Crank lived in Russell County whereas Old Glad Spring, site of Stuart’s emporium, was in close proximity to the Keywood-Clinchburg area as well as, perhaps coincidentally, to Dicey and Spicy Walker whose husbands lived on nearby Bakers Creek. Suffice that this writer believes that Elizabeth Walker, widow of (1) William Walker of Laurel Fork, married (2) John Crank, July 23, 1795 at Glade Spring Presbyterian Church. Again, the church was originally located near a small tributary of Bakers Creek near Capt. James Thompson 1,200 acre Kilmachroan tract which was adjacent to the Meek’s Big Spring tract and the Kirk-Meek Old Stone House.

It is unclear how William Walker’s widow, Elizabeth, and widower John Crank met, especially since Crank lived Russell County, which was formed from Washington County in 1787, before Walker’s death. Nonetheless, records show John Crank received two land grants: (1) 400 acres North Side of Mockison Ridge in 1781, actual settlement 1774; and (2) 396 acres Cooper Creek in 1785. (Summers, 1929)

Several years ago, this writer found a family data sheet for John Crank at a local LDS library and recall that Crank served in the French and Indian War. Court held for Washington County, Virginia on March 20, 1780: Michael Morrison "having produced proof to the Court is entitled to 200 acres of land for military service performed as a Sergeant under the command of the late Honorable William Bird under the King of Great Britain’s proclamation issued in the year 1783 for which he received a warrant. Ordered that the same be certified to the Register of the Land Office of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Order that the same be given John Crank for serving as a soldier in the same (conflict).”

John Crank appeared on Joseph Black's return for 1785 for Washington County lived on the Middle Fork of the Holston, appearing on Joseph Black's return in the upper district of the county. Two years later, however, John Crank appeared on tax list B in lower Washington County.

John Walker, the eldest son of William and Elizabeth Walker of Laurel Fork, married Esther Keywood (Cawood) circa 1791/1792. 28A Esther’s parents, Stephen Keywood/Cawood and Esther Berry, hosted the so-called Keywood Methodist Conference attended by Bishop Asbury in 1788. (Summers, 1903) John Walker and Esther Keywood’s wedding was conducted by Methodist Minister Nicholas Reagan, who lived in nearby Clinchburg. (Brown, 1993) Nicholas Reagan also conducted the marriage of John’s sister, Nancy Walker, to William Gallaher in 1792, and his brother, William Walker, Jr. to Sarah Ann (Annie) Hill in 1799. [28B, 28C]

Dicey and Spicy Walker’s marriages [26A, 26B] were also performed Nicholas Reagan, who by reason of advancing age, was, according to Brown (1993), very “circumscribed” in the performance of his ministerial duties and did not ride a circuit, meaning that the marriages he performed were of couples who resided a short distance from Clinchburg. It should also be mentioned that John Walker’s brother, William Jr., and his wife also owned property adjoining Stephen Keywood’s property. (Wilde, 2005) Simply put, while we normally associate William Walker with Laurel Fork, it is clear that his children are found within two or three miles of Dicey and Spicy after William’s death. Furthermore, Elisha Dungans deposed that William Walker moved to the Middle Fork vicinity in 1780 or 1781. (Chalkley) In short, (1) the year William moved to Laurel Fork and (2) whether he actually moved to the Middle Fork vicinity prior to his death (as stated by Dungans) remains unclear. However, one question that can be answered with certainty is whether his wife’s maiden name was Elizabeth Clayton, as suggested by a 1920’s researcher. The answer is emphatically “no”!

The error crept into the late Wendell Walker’s seminal research on this line, and was repeated by J. "Bob" Walker of Tulsa, Oklahoma, a participant in the Walker Y-DNA Project, who is directly descended from William Walker, Sr. of Laurel Fork. Suffice that the 1920’s researcher speculated whether Elizabeth Clayton and William Walker of Albermarle County, Virginia, were the like-named William and Elizabeth Walker found in the early records of Washington County.

It is evident that with the passage of time, speculation became confused with fact. Recent research instead shows that Elizabeth Clayton married Orlando Jones in Albermarle County in 1771. Following Orlando Jones’ death, his widow, Elizabeth (nee Clayton) Jones, married William Walker of Albermarle County in 1793---three years after the death of William Walker of Laurel Fork! The basis for the speculation appears to have been Albermarle William Walker’s kinship with famed explorer, Dr. Thomas Walker, who owned lands in Washington County.

What happened to Laurel Fork William and Elizabeth Walker’s children? Thanks to family historian Susan Gordon-Wilde we know that sons John, William Jr., and James moved to Claiborne County, Tennessee along with at least one daughter, Lucy, who married William McNew. Susan Wilde wrote:

  • The James Walker you speak of who migrated from Washington Co., VA to Claiborne Co., TN along about 1810 settling on Davis Creek is the youngest son of William Walker, Sr. who settled on the Laurel Fork

of the North Fork of the Holstein River in Washington, Co. James’ older brother, John, the first born in the above family also deeded land along Davis Creek in 1814, and both brothers became owners of land in this and the Henderson Grant. I think these two brothers left Washington Co., VA with each other as they disappeared from there by the 1810 census. They had another brother, William Walker, Jr., who remained in Washington Co., then after the death of his first wife Sarah Ann Hill and a marriage to Elizabeth Warfield in 1817, his family left soon after for Campbell Co., TN buying land in the Henderson Grant, as near as I can figure from the maps all the Walker lands lay along the Powell River and the joining of Campbell and Claiborne counties.



Susan Wilde also provided the following deed records:

  • 16 Sept 1811 Deed Bk. 5, p.116-117. Between Wm. McNew and Lucy his wife of the County of Claiborne, Tennessee and William Walker of Washington, Virginia. For the sum of $200 do grant and sell to William Walker and his heirs one certain tract or parcel of land lying and being in the County of Washington containing 55 acres more or less lying on the waters of the north fork of Holston River. Thirty nine acres whereof was sold and conveyed to the said William McNew by Thomas Cawood and sixteen acres by Thomas Slopes both pieces bounded on a line of George McNew’s old survey to corner to Michael Halfacre’s land, to nigh a path corner to Stephen Cawood’s (Keywood) survey with a line of the same crossing Cawood’s Creek to the top of Cliff of rocks corner to John Donnelson’s land and with his line to the beginning. Signed and Sealed 18 August 1812



  • 15 April 1816, Deed Bk. 6, page 256. William Walker and Sarah his wife of the County of Washington, VA and Abram B. Trigg, Witness that the said William Walker and Sarah his wife for the sum of $250 to them in hand sell to Abram B. Trigg and his heirs a track or parcel of land lying and being in Washington County containing 55 acres more or less lying on the waters of the north fork of Holston River. Thirty- nine acres was sold and conveyed to William McNew by Thomas Cawood and sixteen acres by Thomas Slope, both pieces bounded to wit. (Description same as above deed.) Signed and Sealed by William Walker and Sarah Ann Walker, 16 July 1816



Susan Gordon-Wilde also states that the above “deed is the first record that confirms the full name of Sarah Ann as William’s wife.” Sarah Ann died some time between July 1816 and July 1817 when William married Elizabeth Warfield. According to Susan, the following deed is also the first that places William and Sarah Ann on the Middle Fork of the Holston.

  • 15 Oct 1816 -- Deed Bk. 6, pg. 332: Joseph Snodgrass & Nancy his wife to William Walker all of Washington Co., VA ...$1,824...tract of land containing 152 acres...given to the said Joseph Snodgrass by the last

will & testament of his father David Snodgrass lying in Washington Co. on the north side of the middle fork of Holston River and is bounded as follows to wit, Beginning at a bunch of white walnuts on the north bank of the river near a saltpeter cave running thence S 39 W 60 poles with David Snodgrass's line to a double white oak stump S 54 W 28 poles to a dogwood sprout S 27 W 142 poles to 2 white oak on a knob leaving said David Snodgrass’ lines with a line of Steels N 42 W 140 poles to a double poplar on the west end of a sink hole N 39 E 201 poles to the middle of the creek corner to Benjamin Snodgrass thence running down the several courses of the middle of the same 110 poles to the mouth of the said creek called Little Holstein thence down the North bank of the river to the beginning... Joseph Snodgrass, Nancy Snodgrass Signatures acknowledged 24 Dec 1816 & recorded

Family historian and contributor Susan Gordon-Wilde also posed the following research question to this writer. She wrote: “One of the rules of genealogy for the early years of our country is that families, parents, siblings and cousins, and often with neighboring families migrated together to new lands. This has been my project since I last was in touch with you. We know there was a wave of new people moving from the Valley of Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, etc. south and west on the Great Wagon road and coming through the new lands of Washington County, bought land or squatted awhile before moving on further west. Those few that came before Washington County was created in 1776-1777 had settled mostly (along Bakers Creek) on the Middle Fork of the Holston or near what became Abingdon.”

”Early settlers included the Baker, Cawood, Snodgrass, and Berry families, but not a Walker this early. As for the North Fork of the Holston around the Salt Works the few names that appear either later sold land to William Walker or were neighbors in the 1780's. I noted though from the survey and deeds that David Walker was on the Middle Fork 1770-1774, and John Walker about 1774. I wonder---do you suppose William Walker of Laurel Fork could have been a younger brother of this John Walker who had 300 acres on the south side of Holston opposite John Berry?”

“If William, came with an older brother John and the two families lived and worked on the 300 acres, with John moving on or dying, leaving two daughters with his brother William to watch over Dicey and Spicy. That would put William, Sr. on the Middle Fork 1778-79 before his first 1781deed on the Laurel Fork. This may be far fetched, but I have checked every name attached to William, Sr. and he seems to be just a single family appearing on the valley edge of the mountain wilderness, other Walkers settling on the north side of Clinch mountain---he on the south. Also the Laurel Fork continues northeast to its headwaters leading to Burkes' Garden.”

”Now I know that Stephen Cawood/Keywood migrated from Maryland, the first survey for Cornelius Carmack was about 1774 and I have discovered that he also came from Maryland that is also where the Warfield's came from and were living adjacent to John Carmack. Did William Walker of Laurel Fork migrate from Maryland too?”

In reply to Susan Wilde’s query whether William of Laurel Fork and John Walker of the Middle Fork (a.k.a. Hawkins County John Walker) were brothers. No! The direct male descendants of John Walker of the Middle Fork, who later moved to Hawkins County, Tennessee belong to Group 18 of the Walker DNA Project does not match that of Robert “Bob” Walker of Tulsa, the lone direct, male descendant of Laurel Fork William Walker to participate to date in the project. Susan’s observation that the Laurel Fork Walkers “seem to be just a single family appearing on the valley edge of the mountain wilderness” is correct thus far inasmuch as Robert “Bob” Walker’s DNA does not match any of the Walkers who have participated thus far in the project. (Walker DNA Project, 2006)

Susan’s unasked question, though, is whether the above underlined David Walker who settled “on the Middle Fork between 1770-1774” and William of Laurel Fork were brothers. The only other record this research has found for David Walker is a reference to “David Walker’s old line” [44] in a survey for a tract of land on Bakers Creek adjoining land originally owned by John Kirk, who, according to the Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission, built what became known as the Meek Old Stone House as well as a stone house for Captain James Thompson (which was called Fort Kilmachroan during the Revolutionary War). Spicy (nee Walker) Meek and her husband James Meek, parents of famed mountain man and western explorer Joe Meek, lived in the same Old Stone House Kirk built a stone’s throw from “David Walker’s old line”. Previously, I thought that “Walker’s old line” was likely in reference to Doctor (Thomas) Walker of Albermarle County who owned and sold land in the area, and “Doctor” was mistaken for “David” by the transcriber.

Though speculative, William and David may or may not have been brothers, and Dicey (born in 1770/1771) and Spicy (born in 1776 in Washington County according to family records) may or may not have been David’s daughters. If true, David and his wife may have both died leaving Dicey and Spicy behind in William and Elizabeth’s care along with eight children of their own, seven of who were minors when William died in the winter of 1789/1790. Left with seven minor children as well as possibly two nieces to feed might explain why Spicy Walker was only 14 when she married 16-year old James Meek in 1790 soon after her older sister, Dicey, 19, married Peter Broomberry, a few months after William Walker’s death. To reiterate, Dicey and Spicy’s marriages were performed by Methodist minister Nicholas Reagan, who two years later also performed the marriages of two of William’s sons (John to Esther Cawood/Keywood; William Jr. to Sarah Ann Hill) and his daughter Nancy to William Gallaher. [26A, 26B, 28A, 28B, 28C]

To speculate further, perhaps William and David Walker’s wives were sisters, David died, and his wife remarried but continued to live in the Bakers Creek vicinity and her widowed sister, Elizabeth Walker, moved near, or in with, her after William’s death in the winter of 1789/1790. I am also reminded of Spicy (nee Walker) Meek’s nationally publicized profession of faith on her deathbed in 1821. Printed in a widely circulated Methodist publication printed in New York City, the article stated that Spicy adopted Methodism as a young girl (about the time of the Keywood Conference) and that she steadfastly believed that she would also see her Presbyterian relatives in heaven.

Dicey and Spicy WalkerEdit



Dycay (Dicey) Walker (1770/1771-1823) married [Peter Brymberry] (1767-1830) in Washington County, Virginia in 1790 and Spicy Walker (1776-1821) married James Meek in Washington County, Virginia in 1791. Both were Methodists and their obituaries both appeared in Methodist publications. According to a national Methodist publication, Spicy (Walker) Meek adopted Methodism when she was about 12 (probably at the Keywood Conference attended by Bishop Asbury in 1788). Her headstone indicates Spicy died July 20, 1821, age 45 years. (McConnell, 1968) Why her lengthy obituary would appear in a national publication found in a collection at Emory-Henry College before her son, mountain man and explorer Joe Meek, gained prominence remains a mystery.

This writer’s ancestor, Dicey (Walker) Brymberry’s obituary also appeared in a Methodist publication --- the Mt. Zion (Hancock Co., GA) Missionary. On November 3, 1823 it printed “Mrs. Dicey Brimberry, died (no date given) in Greenville District, S.C., 52 years, wife of Peter Brimberry.” Peter was a wagon maker, a craft learned from his father, Matthias Brymberry, who first appeared in the deed records of Washington County, Virginia in 1785, which placed him on Bakers Creek near McCall’s Gap. Peter’s mother was Mary Anderson, daughter of Peter and Catherine Lynam (Linam). Peter’s parents were married at Old Swedes Church in Wilmington, Delaware in 1766, and moved soon afterwards to Orange County, North Carolina near the present-day boundary of Caswell and Alamance counties. (Brimberry, 1997)

Land grant records available online through the Library of Virginia indicate that a total of 31 grants were made referencing Bakers Creek, today known as Huttons Creek. Four grants are particularly important including one placing Peter’s father, Matthias Broomberry, on Bakers Creek (a.k.a. Thompson’s Creek and Eleven Mile Creek):

1. Page 298 - John McCall, assignee of Mathias Broomberry, assignee of Jacob Jastines, assignee of William Burch, assignee of Nicholas Stevens - 50 ac - Commissioners Certificate - on the head of Thompson's (Bakers) Creek, the waters of the Middle Fork of Holstein - beginning corner to George Baker - corner to Humphrey Baker - the foot of Walkers Mountain - November 1, 1785

2. A 1785 land office grant to John Kirk references 300 acres “on both sides of Bakers Creek a branch of Holstein River adjoining Bates corner.” John Kirk built the Old Stone House that later became Spicy Walker and James Meek’s homestead, across from the Great Road from her father-in-law, Joseph Meek’s Big Spring tract which adjoined Col. Aaron Lewis’ property and Captain James Thompson’s Kilmachroan tract.

3. 1783 land office grant to John McHenry referencing the “corner of David Walker’s old survey,” John Kirk’s land and Joseph Meek’s land:

Page 44 - John McHenry...400 ac...Commissioners Certificate...on the head waters of Eleven Mile Creek, branch of the Middle Fork of Holston River and at the foot of the south side of Walkers Mountain...Beginning corner to George Cleeks land...at the foot of Walkers Mountain...by a road...corner of David Walkers old survey...corner to (K)Derks land...line of Meeks land...June 6, 1783

4. A 1792 land office grant to William Dickson references 60 acres “on Bakers Creek a branch of the middle fork of Holstein River adjoining Broomberry’s line.” The Old Indian Path and Iron Works road are also cited.

These and other land office grants allow us to pinpoint the location of David Walker’s property with considerable accuracy, especially since Bakers Creek is a relatively short tributary and we know from other official records that John Kirk built the historic Old Stone House later purchased from Kirk and occupied by James and Spicy (Walker) Meek --- parents of the famous mountain man and explorer, Joe Meek. The Kirk-Meek Old Stone House still stands a few feet from U.S. 11 or what used to be the Great Road---near the Washington-Smyth County line.

Baker’s Creek (present day Hutton Creek) originates approximately one to two miles north of Glade Spring in the direction of Keywood (site of the first Methodist conference west of the Appalachian Mountains in 1788), then meanders eastward across State Route 91 before coursing southward parallel to County Road 751 then merges with present day Thompson Creek near the Kirk/Meek Stone House, then emptying into the Middle Fork of the Holston River. The total distance is 3 to 4 miles.

Because David Walker, who is only mentioned twice in the land records of Washington County, may have been Dicey and Spicy’s father, the writer is repeating a discussion from above concerning the Laurel Fork Walkers. Also note that a 1785 Washington County petition to create Russell County was signed by David Walker (Albert, 1972) who did not reappear before on the tax lists of Washington County or afterwards in either county.

“Susan Wilde inquired whether David Walker who settled “on the Middle Fork between 1770-1774” and William of Laurel Fork were brothers. The only other record I have found for this mysterious David Walker is a reference to “David Walker’s old line” in a survey for a tract of land on Bakers Creek adjoining land originally owned by John Kirk, who built what became known as the Meek Old Stone House as well as a stone house for Captain James Thompson which was called Fort Kilmachroan during the Revolutionary War. Spicy (nee Walker) Meek and her husband James Meek, parents of famed mountain man and western explorer Joe Meek, lived in the Old Stone House Kirk built a stone’s throw from “David Walker’s old line”.

“Though speculative, William and David may or may not have been brothers, and Dicey (born in 1770/1771) and Spicy (born in 1776 in Washington County according to family records) may or may not have been David’s daughters. If true, David and his wife may have both died leaving Dicey and Spicy behind in William and Elizabeth’s care along with their own eight children, seven of who were minors when William died in the winter of 1789/1790. Left with seven minor children as well as possibly two nieces to feed might explain why Spicy Walker was only 14 when she married 16-year old James Meek in 1790 soon after her older sister, Dicey, 19, married Peter Broomberry, only a few months following William Walker’s death. To reiterate, Dicey and Spicy’s marriages were performed by Methodist minister Nicholas Reagan, who two years later also performed the marriages of William’s son John to Esther Cawood/Keywood and William’s daughter Nancy to William Gallaher.”

“To speculate further, perhaps William and David Walker’s wives were sisters, David died, and his wife remarried but continued to live in the Bakers Creek vicinity and her widowed sister, Elizabeth Walker, moved near, or in with, her after William’s death in the winter of 1789/1790. I am also reminded of Spicy (nee Walker) Meek’s nationally publicized profession of faith on her deathbed in 1821. Printed in a widely circulated Methodist publication printed in New York City, the article stated that Spicy adopted Methodism as a young girl (about the time of the Keywood Conference) and that she steadfastly believed that she would also see her Presbyterian relatives in heaven.”

Dicey Walker and Peter Brymberry had 14 children, 10 of who reached adulthood: John, Mary, Sarah, George Anderson, Matthias, Susan W., Elizabeth, Amelia Caroline, William Harrison, and Armanda. (Brimberry, 1997) Spicy Walker and James Meek also had 14 children: Mary, Lydia, Diciy, Susan, Janey, Hiram, Spicy, James, Samuel, Fanney, Joseph Lafayette, Hannah, and Charles W. (Fluhart, 1989) The underlined names were the first names of Peter Brymberry and James Meek’s respective parents. It is plausible, if not likely, that Dicey and Spicy also named a daughter and son after their parents, in which case John and Susan are the only two overlapping names. At the same time, it is counter-intuitive that neither of them named a son “David” if the mysterious David Walker mentioned above was their father.

Among the small coincidences of history is that (1) half breed William Walker, whose father was taken captive in Washington County, played a prominent role in the settlement of Oregon Territory before becoming Governor of Nebraska Territory (De Veto, 1946); and (2) Spicy Walker’s son, Joe Meek, gained fame at “the Daniel Boone of the Oregon country.” Also called the “merry mountain man” for his self-deprecating humor, Joe Meek too married an Indian woman (Nez Perce), then lost his daughter during the Whitman massacre, and was appointed first U.S. Marshal of Oregon by his purported relative by marriage, President James K. Polk, after trekking across the continent to Washington, D.C. just in time to help settle the Oregon question. According to his biographers, Joe Meek was related to President Polk through his mother Spicy’s Walker kin. (Victor, 1870; Oregon Pioneer Association, 1876)

Likewise, Oren Morton’s 1920 “History of Rockbridge County, Virginia” which on page 228 provides a list of prominent persons whose roots can be traced to Rockbridge County, including “Colonel Joseph L. Meek, relative to James K. Polk, who helped to establish a civil government in Oregon in 1843; and Joel P. Walker, who in 1841 piloted the first emigrant family to the Pacific coast.” The Meek brothers, Joe and Stephen, and the Rockbridge Walker brothers, Joseph R. and Joel P., frequently rendezvoused and explored the west together (Gilbert, 1983; Victor, 1870; et al), leading to speculation that they may him been cousins, especially since two members of this branch of the Rockbridge Walkers married Polk’s two sisters (White, 1902). How did Morton know about Joseph Meek’s Rockbridge connection? Certainly, the source was not Emma White for she wrote on page 180 that Joel P. Walker and his brother Joseph Rutherford Walker, both of California fame, “died young.” Ibid.

Bernard de Voto also prominently mentions Wyandot William Walker (Jr.) as well as the Meek and Walker brothers in “Across the Wide Missouri” noting that an 1833 article published in the Christian Advocate and Journal had a far reaching affect on American history. The Methodist journal article stated that the Wyandots sent a committee West to spy out the land and that one member of the exploring party was William Walker, a well educated, Christianized Wyandot half breed (and Wigton Walker) who had learned through William Clark (of Lewis & Clark fame and now Superintendent of Indian Affairs, about the Flatheads (Nez Perce) in the far Northwest (Oregon). This resulted in a Macedonian cry among the Methodist to establish a mission in Oregon---and the rest, as they say, is history.

Although interesting, these same tidbits of history may have confused and confounded the search for Dicey and Spicy Walker’s parents. The reality is that we do not know their identity, but the likelihood is that they were connected to one of the other Walker lines mentioned above or possibly Isaiah Walker described below. As to Dicey & Spicy’s possible relationship, if any, with Isaiah Walker, it is interesting to muse that both Dicey and Spicy named their first born daughter’s, Mary, and that Spicy and Isaiah’s first born sons were both named Hiram. Spicy also named her third daughter, Diciy, and as already mentioned, Dicey and Spicy also had a daughter named Susan and a son named John. Dicey’s daughter Susan had the middle initial “W”, generating speculation that it might have stood for “Walker”. The counter-argument is, like David, neither one had a son named Isaiah.

See McDonald, Cecil D. 1972-1975 (Reference) for some relevant marriage records. See Walkers of Washington County/McHenry for some notes on possible relationship to the McHenry family.

Isaiah WalkerEdit



According to family data compiled by Martha Russell, Isaiah Walker was born in 1771 in Virginia and wed Elishbeth Murphey in Washington County, Virginia on February 23, 1793. (Russell, 1982) Washington County, Virginia marriage records show the same marriage date and that the marriage was performed by Barbabas McHenry, a Methodist minister who “lived in Rich Valley, not far from the Saltworks”. (Brown, 1993) At the time, Barnabas McHenry was in charge of the New River Circuit (which included Wythe County where another marriage record was recorded the day after Isaiah and Elisabeth Walker’s marriage, making it unclear where the Walker couple were actually married, especially since their marriage is the only one recorded by McHenry in Washington County).

According to these same family records, Elishbeth (Murphy) was born in Ireland in 1775 and “Isah died (in) 1834 Martial (Marshall) County, Alabama” along the Tennessee River. (Russell, 1982) No other record is found for Isaiah Walker in Washington County, Virginia although research suggests that Edward Murphey, believed to be Isaiah’s father-in-law, may have been at the Saltworks, before moving to Blount County, Tennessee, where Isaiah is also found as early as 1801, along with a Joseph Walker, who may or may not have been Isaiah’s father. Joseph Walker is believed to be the like-named Joseph Walker who witnessed the will of John Walker of Meadow Creek in Greene County, Tennessee in 1796. Based on DNA evidence, we know that Isaiah Walker and Meadow Creek John Walker were kinsmen, but not father and son. Possibly, Meadow Creek John Walker was the younger Isaiah Walker’s uncle.

Isaiah Walker maintained a journal containing many names including that of Meadow Creek John Walker’s son-in-law, Michael Blew as well as Gavin Black of Blount County, who may have also been related to Isaiah in some way that is not clearly understood, perhaps on his mother’s side of the family. The journal also contains several pages of entries made by county officials in Montgomery and Wythe County as early as 1789, when Isaiah was only 18-years old. The first entry known to be in Isaiah’s on hand was about his move from Blount County to Roane County on to Coody’s lands. Arthur Coody was a prominent half-breed Cherokee who lived near Painted Rock in Roane County. The journal also contains an entry about Isaiah’s move farther down the Tennessee River to Gunter’s Landing in Marshall County, Alabama, where Isaiah died in 1834 in Marshall County at the age of 63 and his wife Elisabeth died in 1847 at the age of 72.

Isaiah’s journal also mentions the death of Richard Riley in 1832 in Alabama, another prominent half-breed who is credited with introducing Methodism among his people in Alabama. Richard Riley’s name is also recorded in an official Wythe County entry in 1805 while Isaiah was residing in Blount County, suggesting that Richard Riley may have acquired and given the journal to Isaiah Walker who then used it as an accounts ledger and to record invaluable family data.

Isaiah and Elizabeth (Murphey) Walker had 12 children born between 1794 and 1818, nine of who reached adulthood. Their first child, Hiram, was born March 18, 1793. Their second child, Robert, was born October 10, 1795. Isaiah & Elizabeth (Murphey) Walker’s other offspring were Landon Carter (born October 10, 1797); James (born April 29, 1800); Elisabeth (born, January 10, 1802, died one month later); George Washington (born January 14, 1803, died age 2); Charlotte (born August 8,1805); George Washington “Wash” (born July 19, 1808); Selina (born February 15, 1810); Sally G. (born February 26, 1812); Betsy B. (born March 4, 1814); and Thomas J. (born February 17, 1818, died same year). It is also interesting to note that Spicy (Walker) and James Meek also named their first son Hiram.

For additional information concerning this line of Walkers, including kinsman Meadow Creek John Walker, click http://genealogy.wikia.com/wiki/Walker_Home_Page. This group belongs to Walker DNA Group 27.

Other Walkers Known to Have Resided in Washington County Before 1800Edit

Three other Walkers resided in Washington County before 1800: (1) Elizabeth Walker, wife of Thomas Berry and daughter of William Walker & Mary Weir of Rockbridge County; (2) Elizabeth Lyle Walker, wife of Thomas McSpadden, and daughter of Natural Bridge James Walker & Jane Thompson; and (3) Edward Walker, who assigned a preemption warrant issued in 1781 on the Blockhouse Branch of the North Fork of the Holtson River. [56] Edward Walker may be the like-named person found on the early tax rolls of Russell County. The spouses of Elizabeth Walker (Thomas) Berry and Elizabeth Walker (Thomas) McSpadden both appeared on the 1782 Washington County tax list in Capt. Alexander Montgomery’s precinct on the Middle Fork of the Holston River in the lower part of the county. The Berrys followed Elizabeth’s mother’s Weir kin to Blount County about 1797. The McSpaddens remained in Washington County in the Rock Spring area between Old Glade Spring and Damascus. These three Walkers appear to have been unrelated to one another as well as to the other Walker lines described above. For additional information about the Walker-Weir-Berry line see the extensive research of Susan Vass. For additional information about the Walker-McSpadden line, click http://genealogy.wikia.com/wiki/Wigton_Walkers . Also see White (1902; p.180-181), with the knowledge that the McSpaddens settled in Washington County much earlier than indicated by White.

Research DataEdit

The following is a compendium of data related to the various Walker Families in Washington County, Virginia: 1773-1799

1. Walker Land Office Grants: Summers, “Annals of Southwest Virginia”, pages 1252-1254

[1] 1781, Aug. 8 Walker, John 300 ac. Sinking Creek near the Sink; 1773 actual settlement
[2] 1781, Aug. 18 Walker, John 200 ac. Moccasin Creek
[3] 1781, Aug. 31 Walker, John 400 ac. Middle Fork Holston River; 1775 actual settlement
[4] 1782, June 13 Walker, John 195 ac. Middle Fork Holston River
[5] 1782, Sep. 3 Walker, Wm. 400 ac. Laurel Fork Holston River; 1773 actual settlement
[6] 1786, Jan. 2 Walker, Wm. 355 ac. Laurel Fork Holston River
[7] 1786, Jan. 3 Walker, Wm. 7 186 ac. Laurel Fork Holston River
[8] 1789, Feb. 26 Walker, Robert 110 ac. North Fork Holston River

2. Walker Military Veterans from SW Virginia: Summers “Annals of Southwest Virginia”

[9] French & Indian War---Walker, John received 2,000 acres in 1774 for his service
[10] Cherokee Expedition---Walker, John (1776, county of residence not given)
[11] Cherokee Expedition---Walker, Joshua (Washington Co.)
[12] Revolutionary War---Walker, Henry, Joel, John & Samuel (Botetourt Co.)
[13] Revolutionary War---Walker, Alexander (Botetourt Co.) Gilmer’s Co. Va. Militia
[14] Battle of King’s Mountain*---Walker, John & William (1780, county of residence not given but not Washington)
*Alderman & Andrews, “The Overmountain Men”, King’s Mountain soldiers, pages 117-126

3. Walker Tax Payers, Washington Co., VA Personal Property Tax Lists:

1782--- Walker, John [15]; Walker, (torn) [16]; Walker, William [17]
< 1785--- Walker, John [18]; Walker, William [19]
1787--- Walker, John [20]; Walker, John Jr. non-tithable [21]; Walker, William [22]; Walker, Robert [23]
1790--- Walker, Robert [24]

4. Walker Marriages, Washington Co., VA: (Summers, 1929: 1256-1272)

Ref Year Groom Bride Minister
[25] 1786 Walker, Joshua Elizabeth Bunde (Thomas Woolsely, Baptist)
[26A] 1790 Broomberry, Peter Walker, Dycay (Nicholas Reagan, Methodist)
[26B] 1791 Meek, James Walker, Spicy (Nicholas Reagan, Methodist)
[27A] 1792 Walker, John Pitcher, Susanna (Jacob Zink, Lutheran)
[27B] 1792 Pitcher, John Walker, Margaret (Jacob Zink, Lutheran)
[28B] 1790/1792 Walker, John Cawood, Hester (Nicholas Reagan, Methodist)
[28B] 1790/1792 Gallaher, William Walker, Nancy (Nicholas Reagan, Methodist)
[29] 1793 Walker, Isaiah Murphey, Betsy (Barnabas McHenry, Methodist)
[30] 1795 Crank, John Walker, Elizabeth (widow) (Edward Crawford, Presbyterian)
[28C] 1799 Walker, William Jr. Hill, Sarah Ann (Annie) (Nicholas Reagan, Methodist)



5. Will, Probate, Deed & Other Washington Co., VA Court Records:

[31] 1778 John Walker will probated 11/17/1778; children, Ann Bell, John & Samuel; g-son William.
[32] 1779 Samuel Walker inventory & appraisement of estate exhibited and ordered 8/17/1779.
[33] 1789 Inventory of merchant Thomas Stuart’s estate lists William Walker, Peter Brymberry & James Hendricks and 258 others as owing money on account for merchandise sold by his emporium in Old Glade Spring.
[34] 1790 Wm. Walker to James Craig. Amount of land not specified; for a considerable sum of money.*
[35] 1793 John & Hannah McHenry to John & Wm. Walker, Jr. (sons of Wm. Sr.) 190 acres on the north fork of the Holston River in Rich Valley.*
[36] 1795 Robert Walker & Elizabeth his wife to George Buchanan 100 acres on the waters North Fork of the Holston, on the north side of Walkers Mountain. 1/20/1795 $67
[37] 1796 James Walker & Wm. Gallaher, heirs of William Walker to James Craig their interest in 186 acres of land on the Laurel Fork, a north branch of the North Fork of the Holston River.*
[38] 1797 Wm. Carmack, husband of Elizabeth Walker to James Craig their interest in 1000 acres on both sides of Holstein, adjoining Piney Mountain.*
*Heirs of William Walker who died intestate in 1790

6. Washington County Warrants and Surveys

1781 Page 81 - James King Carr...185 ac...Commissioners Certificate...on both sides of Mockeson Creek, north branch of the north fork of Holstein River...Beginning on the bank of the creek on Alexander Barnett’s lower line...April 29, 1782 - James King Carr, heir of James Kerr, assignee of John Walker...200 ac...on Mockinson joining John Walkers below by a line crossing at the ford of the Creek and Alexander Barnett above, includes improvements, 98 ac surveyed on December 11, 1774 for John Walker...August 20, 1781 39

Page 105 -John Walker...June 13, 1782...195 ac...on the waters of the Middle Fork of Holstein River...Commissioners Certificate...Beginning in Edward Farris line in a gap of the ridge...on Gen. Campbells old patent line - John Walker...400 ac...on the waters of the Middle Fork of Holstein joining Gen. William Campbells patent line, includes improvements...actual settlement made in 1775...August 31, 1781 Page 105 - Stephen Keywood...100 ac...in the Rich Valley...Commissioners Certificate...Beginning corner to Walkers old survey...January 15, 1783 - Stephen Keywood...100 ac...in the Rich Valley on the waters of the north fork of Holstein joining the land whereon he lives, includes improvements, actual settlement made in 1774...August 27, 1781 [41]

Page 41 - Moses McSpedon...200 ac...commissioners certificate...on the south east side of Holston River...Beginning on a bank of a creek called Laurel fork running into Holston - Moses McSpaddin, assignee of Ebenezer Alexander, assignee of James Gilliban, assignee of John Walker...300 ac...on the south side of Holston River opposite John Berrys, includes improvements, actual settlement made in 1774...August 29, 1781 [42]

1782 Page 50 - James Taylor, assignee of Archibald Mahon, assignee of John Walker...200 ac...Commissioners Certificate...on both sides of Mockison Creek, north branch of the north fork of Holston River...Beginning in the head of a hollow corner to James King Carr’s land he now lives on...in a gap of a ridge...on the bank of the Mill Pond...April 30, 1782 - John Walker...200 ac...on Mockison adjoining James King Kerr above by a line crossing at the ford and Christopher Huston below, to include the place whereon he now lives, actual settlement made in 1773...August 18, 1781 - Assigned to Archibald Mahon by purchase on April 1, 1782. Signed: John Walker. - Assigned to James Taylor by purchase on April 20, 1782. Signed: Archibald Mahon. Witness: Robert Preston [43]

Page 82 - Christopher Huston...100 ac...Commissioners Certificate...on both sides of Mockeson Creek, north branch of the north fork of Holstein River...Beginning on a rocky spur corner to the land John Walker now lives on...by a path...along a rocky brake of the land...April 30, 1782 [44]

Page 267 - John Walker, heir of John & Samuel Walker, decd...300 ac...by settlement in 1773...on Sinking Creek near the sink which was surveyed for John Walker on April 2, 1774...August 8, 1781 - Assigned to John Donnell on August 10, 1782. Signed: John Walker. Witness: Robert Preston - Assigned to James, Robert & John Barr on August 10, 1782. Signed: John Donnell [45]

Page 280 - Samuel Gibson...214 ac...on the waters of the Middle Fork of Holstein River...Commissioners Certificate...Beginning near a line of the old survey belonging to the heirs of Gen. Campbell, decd. being a corner of John Walker's tract...corner to Samuel Whites land...May 8, 1785...Samuel Gibson - 400 ac. - adjoining Gen. William Campbell's patent land, includes improvements, actual settlement made in 1772...August 29, 1781. [46]

Page 325 - William Walker - 355 ac - Commissioners Certificate - on the Laurel fork of Holstein River - on a precipice by the said fork - by a path at a spring - along the foot of Piney Mountain by said path - in a swamp by the river - by the Valley path - on a spur of the flat mountain - January 2, 1786... William Walker, assignee of James Crabtree, assignee of John Newlan, assignee of Henry Dougherty - 400 ac - on the Laurel fork a branch of the north fork of Holstein river, includes improvements, actual settlement made in 1773 - September 3, 1782 [47]

1783 Page 44 - John McHenry...400 ac...Commissioners Cert. on the head waters of Eleven Mile Creek, branch of the Middle Fork of Holston River and at the foot of the south side of Walkers Mountain...Beginning corner to George Cleeks land...at the foot of Walkers Mountain-by a road-corner of David Walkers old survey, corner to Derks land, line of Meeks land June 6, 1783 [48]

1785 Page 298 - John McCall, assignee of Mathias Broomberry, assignee of Jacob Jastines, assignee of William Burch, assignee of Nicholas Stevens - 50 ac - Commissioners Certificate - on the head of Thompson's Creek, the waters of the Middle Fork of Holstein - beginning corner to George Baker - corner to Humphrey Baker - the foot of Walkers Mountain - November 1, 1785 [49]

1786 Page 327 - William Walker - 186 ac - treasury warrant #6495 dated September 13, 1781 - on the Laurel fork of Holstein River - by the fork corner to his adjacent survey - in the bent of the river - at the foot of Piney Mountain - by a path - in a gap of said mountain - in the fork of Laurel branch by a path - January 3, 1786 [50]

1789 Page 373 - Robert Walker, assignee of John Thomas - 110 ac - treasury warrant dated February 21, 1783 #2387 - on the waters of the north fork of Holstein and on the north side of Walkers Mountain - beginning on a line of Mathias Andis' land - February 26, 1789 [51]

1794 Page 413 - Jacob Shutters, assignee of Robert Walker - 150 ac - treasury warrant #2387 dated February 21, 1783 - on the top of both sides of Walkers Mountain - on the north side of said Mountain near the head of Robert Henderson's creek, a south branch of the north fork of Holstein River - November 26, 1794 [52]

Page 413 - Jacob Shutters, assignee of Robert Walker - 150 ac - treasury warrant #2387 dated February 21, 1783 - on the top of both sides of Walkers Mountain - on the north side of said Mountain near the head of Robert Henderson's creek, a south branch of the north fork of Holstein River - November 26, 1794 Page 413 - Hellins Dungans, Levi Bishop & Peleg Tillson - 330 ac - Commissioners Certificate - corner to Elisha Dungan's land - leaving Dungans corner - with Sampson Cole's line - on Tillson's line - October 13, 1794 Page 414 - Richard Moor - 73 ac - treasury warrant - on the waters of Abrahams Creek, a south branch of the north fork of Holstein River - on a line of James Fulkerson's land - at the mouth of the branch - on a line of Moore's Mill seat tract -on the foot of Walkers Mountain - November 27, 1794 - this survey is void and taken into another survey [53]

1795 (Summers, 1929: 1306) - Robert Walker and Elizabeth his wife to George Buchanan. $67. On the waters of the North Fork of Holston, on the north side of Walkers Mountain, 100 acres (what happened to the other 10 acres????) - January 20, 1795 [54]

Page 417 - James Heron - 10,430 ac - part of 2 treasury warrants - 8942 ac by #974 dated December 13, 1794 and 1488 ac by #973 dated December 13, 1794 - on the waters of the Middle Fork and north fork of Holston River - excluding 150 ac surveyed for Thomas Bates dated September 3, 1790 and 50 of an entry now belonging to Peter Anderson - corner to Peter Anderson's land - crossing Carlock's creek - corner to a survey of Heron - corner to Young's land - corner to Arthur Campbell's land - February 17, 1795 [55]

Page 479 - Abraham Bledsoe, assignee of Edward Walker - 97 ac - Preemption warrant #1980 dated December 20, 1781 - on the Blockhouse branch, a water of the north fork of Holstein - on a line of Margret Vinns's land - by the Saltpetre branch - May 13, 1795 [56]

Page 467 - John Preston, Sr. - 5000 ac - exclude Jacob Shutters 150 ac, Robert Walker 110 ac, Henry Brock, 50 ac, Elijah Gillenwaters 100 ac, John Thomas 150 ac, John Fleenor 100 ac, William McMillion, 60 ac = treasury warrant #1296 dated May 28, 1795 - on Walkers Mountain and the south branches of the north forks of Holstein River also the waters of Beaver Creek, a north branch of Holstein River - near the head of Richard Moor's Mill dam - crossing Mill Creek corner to James Fulkersons land - in a valley - near the foot of Walkers Mountain - leaving Fulkersons line - lines of Nicholas Fleenor - corner to John Fleenor's land - corner to Henry Grimes - corner to Jacob Taylor's land - corner of Godlove Havemarter - by the head of a spring where Hovewaster now lives and a corner of John Davis' land - corner to Massey Ervins survey on the north side of Walkers Mountain in the Rich Valley - corner to Robert Smith - corner to Nathan Smith's survey - corner to Robert Henderson - corner to Gasper Fleenor's survey - corner to John Young - in a gap of Walkers Mountain - October 2, 1795 [57]

Page 426 - Nicholas Fleenor - 124 ac - treasury warrant #17873 dated July 21, 1783 - on a Fork of Beaver Creek, a north branch of Holstein River - line of James Fulkerson's land corner to Fleenor's survey of settlement right - corner to Funkhouser's survey - October 22, 1795 [58]

1796 Page 475 - James Craig and William Craig, assignee of John Walker & William Walker, 2 coheirs of William Walker, dec’d and for Nancy Walker who intermarried with William Galloeher, Elizabeth Walker who intermarried with William Carmack, Margret Walker, Lucy Walker, Elsy Walker & James Walker also coheirs of William Walker, decd - 600 ac - Preemption warrant #2660 - on both sides of the Laurel Fork a north branch of the north fork of Holstein River - on the north side of the Piney Mountain - corner to a tract of land granted to William Walker, decd a certificate of right of settlement - crossing the Laurel fork corner to the settlement survey - on the south side of the flat mountain - crossing Tumbling Creek - corner to Walter Mattinley's survey - near James Crabtree's corner - south side of the Laurel fork - October 11, 1796 [59]

TimelineEdit

Based on records of Walker and Allied Families in Washington Co., VA: 1771-1799 (Compiled by Jerry Brimberry)

YearDescriptionReferences
1771Wigton John Walker III settles on Sinking Creek near the Sink.[1]
1773William Walker settles on Laurel Fork of the North Fork of the Holston near Brushy Mountain.[5, 6, 7]
1775John Walker settles on the Middle Fork of the Holston River.[3, 4]
1776Joshua Walker (1757-1784) & John Walker privates Cherokee Expedition - Washington Co.[10, 11]
1778John Walker IV is appointed administrator of his brother Wigton Samuel Walker's estate.[33]
1778John Walker IV is appointed executor of his father Wigton John Walker III's will.[32]
1780Battle of Kings Mountain Soldiers included John Walker, William Walker, Thomas Woolsey; Capt.’s Andrew Cowan, William Cowan, James Thompson, Aaron Lewis; Major Evan Shelby; Col. Wm. Campbell ( Subsequent research indicates neither Walker was from Washington Co., VA).[14]
1781John Walker IV receives grant on Moccasin Creek .[2]
1781John Walker receives 400 acres on the Middle Fork of the Holston settled in 1775.[3]
1782John Walker receives 150 acres & 195 acres on the Middle Fork of the Holston.[4]
1782William Walker receives 400 acres on Laurel Fork of N. Holston settled in 1773.[5]
1782John Walker, taxpayer Capt. Barnett’s precinct (near Andrew Cowan & Patrick Porter).[15]
1782(torn—Robert?) Walker, taxpayer Capt. Barnett’s precinct (near Andrew Cowan & Patrick Porter).[16]
1782William Walker taxpayer Capt. Robert Campbell’s precinct (clustered with Humphrey Baker, Abraham Leferver, Jacob Henninger, Col. William Russell, Aaron Lewis, Conrad Carlock, Capt. James Thompson, et al associated with Bakers Creek).[17]
1782Joseph Meek, Sr. purchases Big Spring tract next to Col. Evan Shelby & Capt. James Thompson on the Middle Fork of the Holston between Glade Spring & Chilhowie.[60]
1785Matthias Brymberry moves to Washington Co., VA from Orange Co., NC; assigns property to John McCall on Bakers Creek near a spur of Walker Mountain.[49]
1785John Walker of the Middle Fork taxpayer David Ward’s district.[18]
1785William Walker taxpayer David Ward’s district.[19]
1785David Walker signed Washington County petition to create Russell County(Albert, 1973)
1786William Walker receives 355 acres on Laurel Fork of the North Holston River on Jan. 2, 1786.[6]
1786William Walker receives 186 acres on Laurel Fork of the North Holston River on Jan. 3, 1786.[7]
1786Joshua Walker marries Elizabeth Bunde at St. Clair’s Bottom, wed by Baptist minister Thomas Woolsey.[25]
1787Brumberry Matthias taxpayer list B upper county; 2 males 16-21 (resided Bakers Creek).[61]
1787Joseph Meek taxpayer list B upper county; 1 male 16-2 (resided Bakers Creek).[62]
1787Nicholas Reagan taxpayer list B upper county (resided Clinchburg).[63]
1787Peter Stalcup taxpayer list B upper county (resided Bakers Creek).[64]
1787Thomas Woolsey taxpayer list B upper county (resided St. Clair’s Bottom).[65]
1787John Walker, Jr. taxpayer list B upper county; 1 male 16-21.[21]
1787William Walker taxpayer list B upper county (resided Laurel Fork), 1 male 16-21.[23]
1787Robert Walker taxpayer list A lower county.[22]
1789Robert Walker receives 110 acres in Rich Valley on the North Fork of the Holston River. Robert Walker taxpayer list A lower county.[51]
1789Inventory of merchant Thomas Stuart’s estate lists William Walker, Peter Brymberry & James Hendricks and many others as owing money on account.[33]
1790Peter Brymberry (1768-1830) of Bakers Creek vicinity marries Dicey Walker (1771-1823), wed by Methodist Rev. Nicholas Reagan of Clinchburg.[26A]
1790James Meek (1774-1835) of Bakers Creek vicinity marries Spicy Walker (1776-1821), wed by Methodist Rev. Nicholas Reagan of Clinchburg.[26B]
1790William Walker dies “winter of 1790”; son John marries Hester Cawood (dau. of Stephen Cawood & Esther Berry of Keywood). William Walker’s daughter Nancy marries William Golloher. Both couples wed by Methodist minister Nicholas Reagan 1790-1792.[28A, 28B]
1790Robert Walker appears as the only Walker on the 1790 tax rolls of Washington Co.[24]
1792John Walker marries Susanna Pitcher, wed by Lutheran minister Jacob Zink near Wynsdale, lower Washington Co. Pitchers lived in Rust Hollow near Robert Walker.[27A]
1792Margaret Walker marries John Pitcher, wed by Lutheran minister Jacob Zink near Wynsdale.[27B]
1793Isiah Walker (1771-1834) marries Betsy Murphey (1775-1847), wed by Methodist minister Barnabas McHenry whose parents lived in the Saltville area.[29]
1795Elizabeth Walker (widow of William of Laurel Fork) marries John Crank, wed by Presbyterian minister Edward Crawford of Ebbing Spring near Kilmachroan and Old Glade Spring.[30]
1795Robert Walker and wife Elizabeth sell 100 acres on the North Fork of the Holston in lower Rich Valley. Neighbors included John Shutters, John Davis and Mathias Andis.[53, 54, 57]
1799William Walker (son of William & Elizabeth of Laurel Fork) marries Annie Hill, wed by Methodist minister Nicholas Reagan.[28C]

BibliographyEdit

Primary Sources See Definitions

Washington County, Virginia: Marriage, Deed, Will, Probate & Tax Records

Journal & Ledger of Isaiah Walker 1771-1834 (Owned by Robert Wells Walker, Florence, Alabama)

Secondary Sources See Definitions

Albert, A.R. & E.E. (1973). Russell County, Virginia Personal Property and Land Tax List: 1787 through 1800, 1802, 1810 and Legislative Petitions. Publisher and Location Unstated.

Alderman, P. & Andrews, L.B. (1970). The Overmountain Men: Early Tennessee History. The Overmountain Press: Johnson City, Tennessee.

Brimberry, J.L. (1997). Morgan County (Ga.) Heritage: The Brimberry Family. Walsworth Publishing Co.: Indianapolis, Indiana

Brown, D.E. (1993). The Marriages of Washington County, Virginia: 1781-1853. Privately Printed: Abingdon, Virginia.

Brown, D.E. (1993). The Early Ministers of Washington County, Virginia: 1781-1853. Privately Printed: Abingdon, Virginia.

Chalkley, L. ( ). Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, Vol. II: Walker vs. Preston--O. S. 93; N. S. 31, page 105.

DeVoto, B. (1947). Across the Wide Missouri. Houghton Mifflin Publishing Co.: Boston, Massachusetts

Edwards, S.I. (1983). Washington County, Va. Execution Book. Privately Printed: Bristol, Tennessee.

Edwards, S.I. (1984). Washington County, Va. Will Book 1: 1777-1792. Privately Printed: Bristol, Tennessee.

Fluhart, D.M. (1989). The Meek Family of Washington County, Virginia: Some Descendants of Joseph Meek, Sr. Gateway Press, Inc.: Baltimore, Maryland.

Gilbert, B. (1983). Westering Man: The Life of Joseph Walker. University of Oklahoma Press: Norman, OK.

McConnell, C.S. (1968). High on a Windy Hill. The Overmountain Press: Johnson City, Tennessee.

Morton, O.F. (1920). History of Rockbridge County, Virginia. (Reprinted 1980) Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.: Baltimore, Maryland.

Oregon Pioneer Association (1875). Biography of Col. Jos. L. Meek. E.M. Waite Printer: Salem, Oregon.

Russell, M. (1982, May). Freestone Pioneers: (Excerpts) Isaiah Walker’s Journal. Freestone County Genealogical Society: Fairfield, Texas.

Summers, L.P. (1929). Annals of South Virginia 1769-1800. (Reprinted 1970) Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.: Baltimore, Maryland.

Vestal, S. (1952). Joe Meek: The Merry Mountain Man. University of Nebraska Press: Lincoln, Nebraska.

Victor, F.F. (1870). The River of the West: The Adventures of Joe Meek. Bliss & Co.: Newark, New Jersey

Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission (1992). Kirk-Meek House: Historic Landmarks Report 95-26

Walker Surname DNA Project (2006). Data retrieved online September 7, 2006 from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fabercove/test_results.htm

White, E.S. (1902). Genealogy of the Descendants of John Walker of Wigton, Scotland. Tiernan-Dart Publishing Co.: Kansas City, Missouri

Works Progress Administration (1936). Blount County, Tennessee: Index, County Court Record, Book No. 1,1795-1804. (Reprinted) Mountain Press: Signal Mountain, Tennessee.

Works Progress Administration (1936). Blount County, Tennessee: Index, County Court Record, Book No. 2,1804-1807. (Reprinted) Mountain Press: Signal Mountain, Tennessee.

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